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Leumas Security Services LLC in Newport News, Virginia is dedicated to the safety of our clients. Read our blog to find out the many ways you can protect yourself, and to learn more about us.

Election Day

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November 5, 2019


Today is Election Day in Virginia, where Leumas Security Services is based, and three other states.


A lot of attention has been paid to next year’s elections, because of the presidential and congressional contests. There has been a lot in the news recently about various candidates, making sure election systems are secure, and the power of younger voters as well as seniors.


But so-called “off year” elections like today’s are also very important. In many cases, elected officials on the state and local level may have a bigger impact on a person’s daily life.


“As you add voting to your schedule today, remember basic safety practices,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


Griffin suggests you:

Take your time. Add extra time to your travel schedule in order to make it to the polls on time, or to return your absentee ballot to the local registrar’s office. In Virginia, polls close and registrars stop accepting ballots at 7:00 p.m. ET.


Pay closer attention to traffic and pedestrian flow. There may be more people driving or walking in areas you are used to using, and it’s now darker earlier in the evening.


Light things up. If you are walking to your polling place as it gets dark, make sure you wear reflective clothing. You may also consider carrying a flashlight.


Practice civility. There may be people using your polling place who support a person or issue different from those you support. Know in advance how you will politely, but clearly, do what you have to do in ways that keep the peace.

"Fall Back" Into The Dark

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October 29, 2019


Halloween and Day of the Dead celebrations are just days away. That means many people will be out in the dark.


Getting around in the dark will be even more challenging beginning this weekend. Most of the planet will “fall back” when Daylight Saving Time ends on November 3rd at 2:00 a.m.


“You’ll be adjusting your clocks, so it may be a good time to adjust some of your thinking about safety at night,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “Many of us will be doing some of the same things we’ve been doing with our families or at work, but in a few days we may be doing them in the dark.”


Good lighting is very important. Griffin suggests you check to make sure there is appropriate lighting in and around your home.


If you usually walk, exercise, or bike in areas that are poorly lit, consider changing your route or traveling in groups. Also make sure you wear appropriately reflective clothing. If you have children, make similar changes as appropriate in their travels and activities, and suggest similar changes to other family members and friends.


“In most cases, you only need to make small changes,” according to Griffin, “but if you’re not sure, consult a security professional. An hour or two of their time could save you countless hours of suffering.”


Less light also has a big impact on driving. According to the National Safety Council, “While we do only one quarter of our driving at night, 50% of traffic deaths happen at night. It doesn't matter whether the road is familiar or not, driving at night is always more dangerous.”


It’s simply harder to see at night, and it gets harder as we get older. One way to make driving in the dark safer is to go slowly enough to stop within the distance you can see in your headlights.


Driving, and everything you do, is easier if you’re not too tired. Many people feel as if they get an extra hour of sleep when we “fall back.” However, they’re still thrown off a bit by the time change. To make the transition easier, handle it gradually.


You’ve still got a few days before we return to Standard Time to make sure you’re getting enough sleep every night. If you’re not, make changes in your before-bedtime routine. For example, spend less time on the phone or computer screen, lower the lights, and maybe even the temperature of the room where you will sleep. The routine may have to change, at least for several days, for every member of the household.


For additional nighttime safety tips, see our October 8th post about Halloween safety.

Home Eye Safety Month

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October 22, 2019


According to the National Day Calendar, there are several observances in the month of October. For example, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Down Syndrome Awareness Month, Dyslexia Awareness Month, Emotional Wellness Month, Financial Planning Month, LGBT History Month, and, as you might imagine, Halloween Safety Month.


One of the ones that caught the eye of Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin was Home Eye Safety Month.


“We don’t think that much about eye safety, but it can be crucial for a security professional,” Griffin says. “I can’t count the number of times I was able to protect a client, a property, or even myself because of something I saw, and I was able to respond before something bad happened.”


According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, almost half of all serious eye injuries happen at home, but most people don’t wear eye protection.


Planning to rake leaves, prepare a Halloween event with lots of hay, get some home improvement projects completed before it gets too cold, or finally give the basement that deep cleaning it needs before relatives drop by? Make sure you use protective eyewear. Those activities are among the most dangerous, especially if you will be using power tools or chemicals.


Don’t forget lighting. Make sure stairs are well lit, as well as other areas where someone could lose their balance or run into something that may cause an injury.


“Don’t lose time at work because of a preventable injury at home,” says Griffin.


Speaking of work, many of the same practices that protect your eyes at home will help you at work.


According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health reports that “every day about 2,000 U.S. workers sustain job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. However, safety experts and eye doctors believe the right eye protection can lessen the severity or even prevent 90 percent of these eye injuries.”


The two main reasons people suffer eye injuries at work: They weren’t wearing eye protection, or they wore the wrong kind of protection for the job they were doing.


According to the AOA, you can start by knowing what the eye safety issues may be at work, and eliminate hazards before they happen. And of course, use eye protection. AOA’s tips for handling an eye emergency include flushing the eye with water and not rubbing the eye, depending upon the situation. Check out their detailed help here.


“In security work, hazards may include someone trying to attack you and targeting your eyes,” Griffin says. “That’s another reason to stay focused when you are on duty, and eyes that haven’t been compromised elsewhere can help you do that.”

A Security "Guard" Is A Security "Professional"

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October 15, 2019


“A security guard’s job isn’t more serious because it’s armed, or in a particular location,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “ It’s serious because it’s always serious, and genuine security professionals know that.”


Recent news stories from across the nation highlight how dangerous security guard jobs can be. A guard can be shot in a variety of situations that may have seemed safe just moments before. These can even be deadly. A security guard can be physically attacked, or even hit during a sports or other entertainment event.


“You never know what can happen,” Griffin says, “which is why you’re there, and you have to stay sharp. Stay prepared. That can be true of the top professionals in almost any career.”


Griffin always encourages those who want a security career to do everything they can to be prepared for their important work.


In a July 30th blog post he says being in physical shape is great, but a security professional’s most important skills are “good communication, good observation, professionalism, commitment to safety, knowing how to work well with a variety of people, and the ability to multi-task.”


In a July 2nd post Griffin mentions the importance of getting additional training. He says, “You may be certified as an unarmed security officer, and get further training for armed security work in order to get more assignments, earn more money, or be better positioned for a law enforcement position.”


An entire post on June 18th was devoted to the power and importance of how security professionals speak to people. According to Griffin, “The tone and volume of your voice and your body language don’t lose their importance just because you’re in a security position. In fact, they’re even more important.”


Check out these earlier posts for more ways to enhance your ability to be a top security professional.

Get Ready For A Safe Halloween

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Halloween safety

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October 8, 2019


Halloween can be a fun holiday for people of all ages, but it can also be one of the most dangerous.


Research shows that “children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year.”


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin says, “Some of the best ways to keep kids safe are the easiest. It just takes a little planning by every member of the community.”


For example, parents can start by making sure that a child’s costume fits properly, including the shoes. If there’s a mask, make sure the child can see through the eye holes.


“People of any age who are going to be outside wearing a costume should make sure they can be seen,” Griffin says. “A flashlight, or reflective tape and glow sticks work well. Use them as much as possible.”


Use sidewalks, too. Children who will be walking around their neighborhood should be accompanied by an adult or a much older child, and only go to places that are well lit and will welcome trick-or-treaters.


“Adults who enjoy a Halloween party should make sure they do not have so much fun that they’re tempted to drive drunk or distracted,” says Griffin. “If they think they might do too much partying, they should plan a safe way to get home before they leave.”


Adults who drive to Halloween festivities should also consider safety for their car. Park it in a garage or well-lit area, and remove anything that might tempt Halloween pranksters to turn into vandals. Or worse.


“There’s no way to guarantee that everyone will be 100% safe on Halloween,” says Griffin. “Something could always happen that is out of your control. But there’s a lot you can control. Do those things, and you increase your odds of having a great Halloween.”

School Safety: More Than A Bullet-Proof Backpack

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October 1, 2019


The school year is well underway, and many students are already planning Halloween parties. More than ever, students, schools, and parents are planning with safety in mind.


Sales of bullet-proof backpacks have soared in light of shootings in public spaces as well as schools, increasing “active shooter drills” at schools have sparked controversy, and Sandy Hook Promise released the chilling “Back to School Essentials” public service announcement (PSA).


“Parents have to stay engaged to have peace of mind while their children are in school this year,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“Some parents sent their children to school with tracking devices, or bullet-proof backpacks,” he says, “but the parents need to make sure they, and their children, know how to use these things. Parents must make the time to watch videos showing how bullet-proof backpacks and tracking devices work.


“Children must be trained,” Griffin emphasizes. “The training has to happen more than once, and include how to cover up in the event of a school shooting.


"It’s also wise for the parents to know about the emergency training at the child’s school, and make sure the trainings work well together. Don’t confuse kids,” he says.


For additional school safety information, see our blogs on July 23rd and July 26th.


“Parents should talk to school leaders whenever they have security concerns,” says Griffin. “It can feel intimidating at times, but it’s about a safe learning environment for children and peace of mind for parents. Ultimately, that’s what everyone wants.”

Is The Customer Always Right?

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September 24, 2019


The idea that “the customer is always right” comes from retail leaders of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is still important to always respect customers, but are they always right?


Years of experience have taught Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin that the short answer to that question is, “No!” Especially when it comes to their security.


“The security professional’s job often includes guiding the client on security matters,” says Griffin. “We keep him, her, and the general public away from harm. We are trained to spot and respond to unsafe situations so our client doesn’t have to. So they can live their lives.”


Griffin says security professionals should be trained, and continue to train throughout their careers. They must know as much as they can about their assigned position or role, as well as the spaces they work in. This includes marked exits and other emergency escape routes.


They must also be more concerned about the client’s safety than their contract. That's the ultimate form of customer service by a security professional.


“I was working personal security for a client during a large public event,” Griffin remembers. “I quickly threw the client into the corner of a room without warning, and jumped on top of the client. Within seconds a stampede of people knocked down the friends and associates who were around us, but we were untouched. Safe.


“My training and love for my work served me well that night, and many nights since,” says Griffin.


“Most clients aren’t trained to think ‘safety first,’ especially personal safety. That’s why there will be times when they try to get security personnel to agree with them and loosen the restrictions, or don’t follow protocol. Don’t do it! That customer is NOT right,” he says.

Politics And Pro Sports Don't Always Mix

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September 17, 2019


It’s an election year in Virginia, and next year’s presidential and congressional races have had tongues wagging for months. Several of those tongues belong to celebrities.


Famous people, including sports figures, have rubbed elbows with political leaders for ages. That’s true all over the world. But fans don’t always approve, and that can be challenging for security professionals.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin has found himself between fans and the famous, and warns those who want to do that type of security work that it’s not always as glamorous as it seems.


“Once in the mid-1990’s, my client decided to see a basketball game where Michael Jordan was playing,” Griffin remembers. Jordan is a basketball legend who played for two NBA teams, most notably the Chicago Bulls. He continues to make news as a team owner.


“This particular arena held somewhere between 20,000 and 30,000 people, and I learned quickly that fans don’t care how famous you are. If you’re blocking their view, they’ve got a problem with you,” he says.


“A particular group of fans shouted for my client to kneel, because they were waiting for the Chicago Bulls to play. I told the fans to calm down. They advised me and our security team to ‘get out of the way.’


“They proceeded to curse at me and my client, and some started to throw food,” says Griffin.


For security personnel needing to secure a political client at a major sporting event, make sure you take care of the fans, too.


“Don’t walk the stadium to shake hands, especially for votes,” Griffin says. “Fans who want to shake hands with your client will approach the client. It’s also important to keep your client on the first row, or in floor seats to make sure they won’t block a fan’s view. They’re paying customers. We need to always respect that.”

Being A Security Pro In Virginia

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September 10, 2019


“We’re meeting some great people who are very interested in entering the security field, and would be great professionals,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “Unfortunately, too many of them are delayed because they are not certified. Or, they let their certification expire.”


Getting certified is a critical part of the process for everyone who wants to be a security professional in Virginia.


The process includes getting your fingerprints done, which Griffin suggests you do first. He adds that you should do the prints at a location where you can also get your background check.


When you’re ready for certification, take required core subjects training at a facility certified by the state Department of Criminal Justices Services (DCJS). Starting with training leading to unarmed security officer/courier certification gives you valuable basic training, and allows you to start working.


The basic training, and the experience you can get once you start working as an unarmed officer, are perfect ways to start.


“Working as a certified, unarmed officer helps you learn more detailed information about the business, but also about yourself,” says Griffin, “and your ability to really handle the many things that may be asked of you as a security professional.


“For example, you may discover that being a security officer is not right for you, but some other aspect of the business makes sense,” he says.


You may decide to move toward work as an armed security officer. You could be thinking about this as a way of entering law enforcement. Armed security work is also a way many military and law enforcement professionals transition into civilian careers, second or third careers, active retirement work, or part-time jobs that fit their schedules and skills.


Even if you already have skills with weapons, you must still have DCJS certification.


Armed or unarmed, if you want to make this your profession, you must train.


Griffin says to include basic self-defense and handcuffs training, because “you must know how to protect yourself, as a weapon is your last resort.”


Additional training for armed officers should include firearms range training, and make sure to train with the weapon or weapons that you want to be certified with. If you’re interested in working high-risk sites, you may also want to consider shotgun training.


“Remember,” Griffin warns, “you should only use equal force while working any given job site based on that site’s, and your security company’s, standard operating procedures. Good, regular training helps you remember that, and effectively handle your business.”

Properly Store Your Weapon

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September 3, 2019


School-aged children across the nation are hitting the books today. Many are in schools with updated safety protocols, the result of several mass shootings in recent years. Unfortunately, another horrible shooting is in the news.


“We talk a lot about the rights of owning a weapon, but we must make sure we talk twice as much about the responsibilities,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “One of the most important responsibilities is properly securing the weapon at all times.”


Research has shown that more than half of gun owners don’t properly store their weapon. Additional reports show that gun ownership may not make you safer, as does information mentioned in a recent Time magazine article: “Americans have a higher chance of harming themselves intentionally or loved ones accidentally at home from firearms.”


Homes with guns and children may be more vulnerable than adults in the home believe. It is alarmingly easy to find tragic examples of children hurting or killing themselves, or other kids, while playing with guns.


Properly storing your weapon can make a big difference.


An estimated “31 percent of accidental deaths caused by firearms might be prevented with the addition of two devices: a child-proof safety lock and a loading indicator.… More than 80 percent of guns used by youth in suicide attempts were kept in the home of the victim, a relative, or a friend.”


There are several great tips for safely securing your weapon, including:

Use a child safety lock. In addition to the lock, store the weapon in a place where the child, or children, are least likely to find it. Think like your child when you make this decision.


Educate your child/children about gun safety. If you have a weapon in the home, have clear rules about it. However, do not plan on your child consistently following the rules. Children are curious. That’s wonderful, but it can also be very dangerous.


Educate yourself. Make sure your knowledge of how to properly operate, lock, and maintain your weapon is up to date.


Make sure all adults agree. Research has shown that all adults in the home don’t always have the same ideas about what is considered safe storage. Discuss it and make sure. If certain practices are agreed on, then every adult in the household must follow the rules. That includes visitors and babysitters.


“In a lot of tragedies involving guns and children, the children are playing without supervision,” says Griffin. “It’s hard to monitor kids 24-7. I suggest that people combine strategies such as adult agreement on safety, age-appropriate training and conversations with the children, and well-planned security measures.”

Security Goes Back-To-School

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August 27, 2019


One week from today, the doors of almost every school in the US will be open again, heading into what everyone hopes is a great start of the 2019-2020 school year.


More security professionals will also be going back-to-school. Many jurisdictions are increasing security in and around schools, and offering a variety of supports for students.


“Unfortunately, we’ve seen in recent years that schools are not always as safe as we’d like them to be,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “but many communities are doing everything they can to increase the level of safety at their schools.”


Griffin also says, “It’s a great idea for security professionals who also have a heart for children to pursue opportunities to use their skills to protect children in the place where kids spend most of their time.”


More opportunities for that are presenting themselves, and not just for guards.


In Virginia, where Leumas Security Services is based, state funding is aimed at hiring more counselors, and there is a state-run center for school safety. The center provides a range of resources, and manages the annual school safety survey. In fact, this year’s survey is being conducted now through September 30th.


In Cleveland, Ohio, more crossing guards are reportedly being hired, and are considered an important element of security when children start and end their school day.


Detroit and Montgomery County, Maryland, have been putting out the word that they’re hiring new guards. In Newtown, Connecticut, where one of the nation’s most horrific school shootings occurred, a civilian security force is now in place that has been called a model for the state.


For suggestions about school safety operations parents can look for, see our blog post from July 23rd. Tips on keeping kids safe from bullies are in our July 26th post.


“Families should definitely check out school safety plans, and be able to feel comfortable with them,” says Griffin. “I hope they also feel better knowing that security professionals, school systems, and local leaders are working to get better every year at protecting our most precious asset: our children.”

Tracking Devices For Elders

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August 20, 2019


“I recently overheard a conversation at the barbershop about the barber’s father being missing for two days,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “The father has early dementia, and has a vehicle he can use. Apparently the father started off disappearing for a few hours, and then overnight. It’s very scary not knowing the location of an elderly parent with a health condition.”


According to the World Health Organization (WHO), “around 50 million people have dementia, with nearly 60% living in low- and middle-income countries. Every year, there are nearly 10 million new cases.”


Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of dementia, and may contribute to 60-80% of dementia cases.


Dementia and Alzheimer’s can be devastating to people who have these conditions as well as those around them. The WHO reports that the global societal cost is estimated to be about $818 billion.


“No amount of money can capture the emotional toll this can take, but technology can be a big help,” says Griffin. “A tracking device can help you ensure your elders are safe.”


In an earlier post we mentioned tracking devices that can be used with your children. They can be used with seniors, too.

“With most tracking devices the person can have their freedom, and you have some peace of mind knowing where your loved one is 24/7,” Griffin says.


“With so many high-tech devices on the market, you can be completely covered. For example, a device can be placed in your vehicle to track its location and speed. Jewelry is a great way to have a tracking device that can also double as a panic button.


“Many tracking devices have apps that connect them to your smartphone, or they can be incorporated into your home security system,” says Griffin. “Do some research, and then do yourself and your loved one the favor of getting the device that works best for both of you.”


Note: Links to products are for informational purposes only. We do not endorse, or benefit from, any product linked to in this post.

"Kindness Rocks!"

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WISC's 2019 Family Festival
WISC Family Festival 2019
WISC 2019 Family Festival
Kids got to meet animals, too.


August 13, 2019


What an honor to join our neighbors at the Williamsburg Indoor Sports Complex (WISC) for this year’s Family Festival! The 2019 theme: Kindness Rocks.


“I don’t know if there are more challenges today, more ways to hear about them, or both, but all of us need to take every opportunity to come together,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “The WISC Family Festival was a great event, and the theme was perfect.


“It sounds simple, but when you disagree with someone about something it can be hard to be kind. To see them as a member of your community. Events like these are fun reminders that we are all valuable members of the human family,” Griffin says.


“Security professionals often work during events like WISC’s annual Family Festival,” he says, “but they should also make time to attend just for fun.


“Hanging out with family, friends, and neighbors at significant public events helps you relax. It also gives you an opportunity to build relationships with community members, and practice connecting with people in a less stressful environment. Many challenging security and law enforcement encounters are effectively defused by professionals who have great ‘people skills.’


“When it comes to your professional skills, these types of events help you build and strengthen things like your ability to observe behavior and physical attributes (like hair color and clothing), quickly make decisions, and even get used to new shoes you may have to walk in for extended periods of time,” Griffin says.

When The Worst Happens

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August 6, 2019


Our last post encouraged you to be focused, not fearful. However, the rapidly rising number of mass shootings, and tragic deaths and injuries they cause, make that hard for everyone.


“We keep the affected families, and the entire nation, in our thoughts and prayers,” Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin says.


“I feel blessed to be part of an industry that exists to offer more than thoughts and prayers. We help people stay safe,” he says. “We also pray for the brave security and law enforcement professionals who have responded quickly to too many horrible situations like these.”


Griffin reminds people that security teams like ours can provide services, as well as training. However, you can also start right now.


Check out several great resources that give you checklists about the Run-Hide-Fight way of protecting yourself during an active shooter situation. Many of the videos show indoor office settings, but the information is valuable no matter where you are. There are also suggestions about signs someone may be troubled in ways that might lead to dangerous behavior.


Griffin adds a few suggestions.


“Notice that people in the training videos are encouraged to respond and look quickly when they suspect there is an active shooter, and then run” he says. “That reminds us to take note of the exits wherever you are, or the fastest way to leave the place. Sometimes the best exit is near the shooter. Is there a better option? If you have to leave quickly, could you do it? Could everyone with you get away quickly? Know the exits. If at all possible, practice leaving quickly. For women who wear high heels, can you run in them? If not, be able to get out of them quickly and leave them behind.


“When hiding, it is extremely difficult to calm yourself down,” Griffin says. “Practice calming your breathing. Try jogging or jumping jacks, and then practice catching your breath. Wherever you are, look around for places where you could hide, or something you could hide behind, if necessary. Wherever you work, worship, workout, or any place you regularly attend, know the exits and potential hiding places.


“Fighting is the scariest, and hardest, for most people,” Griffin says. “Notice things around you that could be used as a weapon. In some cases, you may want to safely practice. For example, swinging a bat or skillet, or lifting a chair. Have spray cleaners, or even hairspray close by? Use them to blind the attacker.


“Most importantly, whether you run, hide or fight, remember that you are fighting for your life. Encourage those around you to think the same way, so you are less likely to have to pull or leave them.


“Don’t be a hero. Only do what you can to save your life, and be prepared to interact with law enforcement and security professionals when they get there,” Griffin says.


“And don’t lose hope. This summer we’ve been celebrating the nation’s ability to put a man on the moon. And as people often say, if we can put a man on the moon, we can find ways to limit this type of violence.”

Be Focused Not Fearful

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August 2, 2019


People in Gilroy, California, and across the nation, are still trying to figure out why a 19-year old shooter attacked a community festival on July 28th. Three people were killed, including a 6-year old boy, and more than a dozen others were injured.


The tragedy rekindled the concerns of many people who wonder if it’s safe to attend public events at all these days.


“You can’t be guaranteed 100% safety anywhere, including in your own home,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “What you want to do is give yourself, and those you care about, the best opportunity to be safe. To do that you must be focused, not fearful.”


Griffin suggests that when you plan to attend public events, know these 5 things:

Your rules. Make sure you have some, and everyone with you knows them. This includes time limits, and basic safety rules that the children are aware of. For example, children should know not to wander away from the group unless they get specific instructions to do so, and they must follow those instructions.


Your team. Who is with you? Make sure you have a cell/mobile number for everyone (and the phones are charged). Attending with children? Make sure they have a few rules specifically about them, such as to stay still if they get lost, and to ask a mother with a child or a security person for help. Take a picture of the child/children just before you leave home.


Your surroundings. Take a minute to get an idea of where the entrance and exit are as compared to the event’s main activities. Take notice of any emergency exits. When possible, avoid extended amounts of time in the middle of a crowd. Work your way to the outer edges. Stay away from isolated, poorly lit, and off-limits areas. Enjoy yourself, but don’t get so wrapped up in whatever activities you’re doing that you lose track of time and any other people or property you may be responsible for. Prepare the children with you to do the same.


Event security personnel. Notice what the security team is wearing, and where they are located (including if there is a security, information, or first aid area). There are often police officers and security guards patrolling large public events. Knowing this information will come in handy if there is an emergency.


Your emergency plan. If the worst happens, you want to get through it as quickly and safely as possible. Make sure you wear clothing that allows you to move quickly. Have an emergency plan you regularly use that has basics, such as a meeting place in case you are separated from your group, as well as a couple of actions for the specific event. If a child gets lost, look in the area where you last saw the child. Consider what might attract the child away from you, or the place where they were last seen. Call the police if the child is not found in 10 minutes.


See our post from March of this year for safety tips associated with large, indoor events.

Security Can Be A Career For People Of All Abilities

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Wheelchair ability

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July 30, 2019


What is security? It’s a feeling of safety, freedom from fear. A security guard is a person who helps you feel that safety in a particular place, and makes sure things in that place are also safe.


More importantly to us at Leumas Security Services, security is a state of mind.


“Since security is really a state of mind, a variety of people can work in the security business,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “That includes people with so-called disabilities. If that’s you, I encourage you to consider applying for security positions.”


People with different levels of ability are often encouraged to work from home, or do work that is mostly stationary. Fortunately, technology has made it possible to work from home in more responsible and rewarding careers, such as web design, e-commerce, and information technology jobs. Technology also makes it more possible to earn a living with artistic pursuits such as jewelry-making.


“There are many positions in a security company,” Griffin says, “and most locations have wheelchair access and elevators, if that’s your concern. Let your ability help you focus on what you could do with a security company, including working as a guard.”


A great security guard has several skills. The most important ones are good communication, good observation, professionalism, commitment to safety, knowing how to work well with a variety of people, and the ability to multi-task.


Yes, a certain amount of physical ability is required, but that mostly depends upon the specific security job. For example, a person in a wheelchair can manage a security check-in desk, as well as many patrol areas. A person with hearing challenges can handle many of the administrative and team management needs of a security firm, and monitor video cameras with visual alarms.


“Don’t let your level of physical ability determine your future,” Griffin says. “You never know if you will hit the ball unless you swing.”

Remembering "Sweet Pea" Whitaker

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Boxing Great Whitaker

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July 28, 2019


“I am still keeping the family of Sweet Pea Whitaker in my prayers, as I think about the impact he had on my life,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


Boxing great Pernell “Sweet Pea” Whitaker died July 14th, after being struck by a vehicle on a street in Virginia Beach, Virginia.


“It’s easy to remember him as the incredible boxer he was,” Griffin says, “but I’m a member of the community who knew that he was so much more.


“In the late 1990’s I was building my business, starting out as Griffin’s Executive Protection Agency,” Griffin remembers. “Sweet Pea Whitaker regularly visited a local nightclub my guards were assigned to secure. Not only was he a pleasure to meet, but he tipped my employees. He never had to do that. He just did.


“Having a celebrity like Whitaker interact with my early employees was a great shot of energy that let me know my dreams of successfully running my business could come true,” Griffin says.

Back-To-School, Back-To-Bullying?

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Back-to-school bullies

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July 26, 2019


Your outgoing 13-year old suddenly becomes quiet and doesn’t want to do things she usually loves. Your friend’s 4-year old really enjoyed camp on Friday, but it’s Monday and he refuses to get out of the car when he gets there. Your brother can’t figure out why his 16-year old son they call the “human vacuum cleaner” at dinner is skipping meals, and your neighbor said she’s worried about her 9-year old’s nightmares.


These could be signs that the youngsters are victims of bullying.


Bullying is “unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.”


A “perceived power imbalance” could be something like a bigger student pushing a student who is weaker, or appears to be. It could also be a popular child using social media to spread embarrassing and/or negative information about a less popular student.

Being bullied, being a bully, and even witnessing bullying, can have a lasting negative impact on the emotional well-being of a young person.


That’s especially bad news because a Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute article stated that “between 21 and 49 percent of youth adolescents report being bullied in the past year,” and more than 70% of youth are bystanders to bullying.


That sounds like a huge reason to hate the start of a new school year. While you are planning, your child could be worrying. But there is a lot that you, your child, school administrators, and teachers can do.


If you suspect that your child is, or has been, bullied, research suggests you:

Keep the lines of communication open. Most kids don’t report being bullied, so spend time creating an environment where your child feels that you will listen to the child’s concerns. If you suspect bullying, create opportunities to lovingly bring up the subject in ways that are appropriate for your child. When your child opens up about the situation, do not immediately jump in with courses of action. Listen.


Be on your child’s side. Believe your child, and do not dismiss your child’s concerns about whatever happened or is happening. Clearly state that you are on your child’s side. If appropriate, you and your child can discuss the best way to handle the situation. However, you make the final decision. Set ground rules. For example, if you use the child’s suggested approach for a set amount of time and the bullying continues or intensifies, you will then switch to the adult’s approach.


Know the policy. Find the appropriate policy at the school, workplace, or other organization, where your child was bullied. You may have to get it from the school, or other place where the bullying is taking place.


Contact responsible adults at the site of the bullying. The child can be bullied at school, camp, work, or even a community organization where they are a volunteer. If the child is being cyber-bullied, the child may have met the bully at one of the places they frequent, such as the ones listed here. Contact the teacher, counselor, supervisor, manager, or another appropriate leader you can schedule an in-person, phone, or online meeting with in order to discuss the matter.


Have a Plan B. If the situation cannot be resolved with the help of leadership at the place where the child is being bullied, and possibly the family of the bully, take the matter up the chain of command. For example, in a school system you may have to walk into the school superintendent’s office. You may have to approach outside authorities, such as private counselors, appropriate community leaders, and law enforcement officials. Some parents take their child out of the school where the child was being bullied.

Back-To-School Safety

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Back-to-school safety

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July 23, 2019


Every child should be able to learn in a safe environment. Unfortunately, that is not always the case, and any school’s learning environment can be shattered in seconds.


“If you have school-aged children, you’re probably already in back-to-school mode,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “We had a recent blog post about planning, and want to dig even deeper into what we think about all the time: safety.”


And with good reason. All types of emergencies can happen that can shake an entire school community. It helps to know that there is a plan in place to handle them, especially events such as shootings and fires.


Shootings have occurred in schools throughout the nation’s history, and there have been 11 deadly mass shootings since the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School. As for fires, there are thousands of them each year. Both can be traumatizing for students, and everyone connected to the school.


There are many questions parents should ask to make sure their child’s school is a safe space, and that the school’s safety protocols include all students.


Many schools are constantly working to make sure their safety policies and procedures are effective. We urge you to find out what those procedures are at your child’s school, and give administrators there the benefit of your concern, commitment, and expertise.


We also suggest you pay close attention to the school’s:


Building and physical plant safety measures. Be sure the structure is secure, is well maintained (clean, structurally sound, has appropriate lighting, etc.), and has an active emergency notification system. How does that system engage parents? If certain information is needed from parents or caregivers, make sure you give it to the school, and keep it up to date.


Building access procedure. There must be a clear system for letting people in and out of the building. This system should prescreen visitors, and surprise visits by anyone other than a child’s parent/caregiver should be avoided.


School grounds. How does the school decide the appropriate number of teachers/staff that supervise children at any given time? What is that number? Does that include during recess, or other out-of-class time activities on school property? Children should not be allowed to leave school grounds without prior, appropriate authorization. What are the security measures for school dismissal (end of the day when children leave school grounds)?


Resource (security) officer. We suggest schools have a full-time resource officer. In some communities this is a police officer. This can also be a security officer who works directly for the school system, or a private security company. Check the officer’s training, especially training that is relevant for work with the school’s students.


Evacuation and lockdown/shelter-in-place drills. When and how are they handled? What are the goals? How do you define a successful drill? Do these consider students of all abilities? What is the process for updating the drills, and what are updates based on? Is there a section, or are there sections, of the school where students, teachers, and other school personnel can be completely sealed away from a dangerous intruder?

Make Sure Your Child Has An ID Card

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Child should have ID

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July 19, 2019


“All children 15 years of age or younger should have some form of state identification,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It’s not required to travel, but there are several good reasons to have one.”


Griffin says, “Children often get lost at amusement parks and playgrounds during this time of year. The first few hours after a child goes missing are critical, and an ID card can help save valuable time.”


Check your state motor vehicles agency for information about getting a child’s ID. In Virginia, for example, identification cards are issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles. According to the website, “The child’s photograph is stored in DMV’s database. If the child becomes missing, DMV can retrieve the image from the database and transmit it to law enforcement anywhere in the U. S.”


As you might imagine, there’s also an app for child ID cards. An FBI app to be exact. The FBI’s Child ID App “allows users to store up-to-date images and physical descriptions—like height, weight, birthmarks, etc.—that could help responders in the event of an emergency. The information is stored only on your device—not with your mobile provider or the FBI.”


Don’t forget to safely store copies of the child’s ID, or app information, and keep them up to date.


Many people invest in tracking devices for their child. It is also important to be aware of national resources and organizations that can help you cope in case the worst happens. Check for local options, too.


Of course, the best strategy is to do everything in your power to make sure your child does not become one of the thousands of children who go missing every year in the US. Some make headlines, but most don't.


To help keep your child safe, or any child in your care, make sure you research safety tips. Great strategies include making time to know any of the child’s care providers (including camp staff where possible), know where the child is and who the child is with, talk to your child about safety, and teach the child that it is alright to speak up when they do not feel safe.


Remember that children are much more likely to report feeling scared and sad to an adult they can trust. Spend time getting to know your child, so the child will come to you when they need to feel safe.


Note: Links to products are for informational purposes only. We do not endorse, or benefit from, any product linked to in this post.

Structure Your Business For Safety

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Starting a business

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July 16, 2019


Thinking about starting your own business, or taking a step forward in the small business you already operate? Excellent! We want to remind you that the way your business is structured can help keep you safe.


We don’t mean physical safety, which we usually discuss here. We mean financial safety.


Yours would likely be a small business, like most businesses in the United States. The way the business is structured can help protect your personal assets in case your business faces a lawsuit brought by an individual or another company.


Common business structures include a sole proprietorship, Limited Liability Company, and a corporation. There are various types of corporations.


A sole proprietorship is where a single individual owns and operates the business. This person bears all of the rewards as well as the risks.


A Limited Liability Company (LLC) can have a tax identification number, is a separate entity from the owner, and the owner is not personally liable for some debts if the business in most situations.


A corporation is a separate legal entity that is operated by a board of directors. “After incorporation, stock is issued to the company's shareholders in exchange for the cash or other assets they transfer to it in return for that stock. Once a year, the shareholders elect the board of directors, who meet to discuss and guide corporate affairs anywhere from once a month to once a year.”


To decide which business structure will work best for you, it is important to consider factors such as your growth plan, financial needs, and whether the nature of your work is likely to expose you to being sued by customers or creditors.


Making the right decision from the beginning is a great way to protect your business. Spend time learning from others, such as renowned entrepreneur Daymond John, and people in your desired industry. If you really believe in what you want to achieve, you can find a way to get there.

Back-To-School Planning

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Back-to-school planning

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July 12, 2019


The Leumas Security Services team trusts you, and the people you care about, are having an enjoyable and safe summer.


To make sure the school year starts that way - safe and fun - for any young people in your life, we encourage you to add back-to-school planning into your schedule.


Planning ahead can help you make the most of special opportunities. For example, the Virginia Sales Tax Holiday begins three weeks from today. Other states have similar periods. This is a great time to get back-to-school supplies and clothing, as well as emergency preparedness gear and energy-saving products.


Planning also makes it easier for you and the students to ease back into the challenges often faced during the first several weeks of the school year.


Here are a few suggestions:

Be ready to meet the requirements. From immunizations and registration forms, to special supplies and clothing, make sure you know what the child’s school says each student must have in order to attend. Even if the child is attending the same school, some requirements may have changed. For example, bus stops may be in new locations, and some schools are encouraging see-through backpacks.


Make sure special concerns get special care. Build in time to make sure any required paperwork and meetings are completed on time if your child has special situations. These include food allergies, is considered special needs with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), or has a mental health or learning challenge.


Practice school safety with summer safety. Add walking in areas similar to the one near your child’s school, a public or private bus trip, or your teen driving to your remaining summer outings. Model and practice appropriate safety procedures for whatever form of transportation you use. This includes making eye contact with drivers before crossing the street, wearing properly fitted bike helmets, and obeying the speed limit while driving. Whether walking, biking, or driving, stay focused!


Connect with the concerns. The start of a new school year can be very stressful to a child for a variety of reasons. Create opportunities to discuss the coming school year with your child, and make sure you listen carefully. Let the child know that you have taken in the information, and will work with the child to handle the concern.


Find the fun. Create ways to celebrate the start of the school year, like a special breakfast or dinner. Point out that the higher grade, and maybe height, are great signs of growing up. Add fun activities to bedtime, and spend at least four weeks using them to help gradually move the child’s bedtime to what it will need to be during the school year.

Living The Legacy

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Living the Legacy
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July 9, 2019


“She was my heart,” Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin says of Hilda Mae Jones. “I promised I would take care of her, so this is a way I’m still doing that.”


“This” is Leumas Security Services’ sponsorship of the first Hilda Mae Jones Foundation 4th of July Cookout. The foundation awards scholarships, provides supplies for incarcerated individuals, and offers a range of supports to people who need a hand up while working to help themselves.


Griffin says the foundation’s focus is on “the least of these.” He says, “So many people need some help until their government assistance kicks in. The foundation bridges that gap, helping to instill hope in those who would otherwise give up.”


The organization continues the work of Sister Jones, as she was affectionately called by her beloved Church of God family. She devoted countless hours to the historic church founded by Elder Lightfoot Solomon Michaux, and its service to the world. The cookout was held at the church's renowned James City County Bible and Agricultural Training School.


No matter what she experienced, Sister Jones was a lifelong model of love and perseverance.


“She was my grandmother, and the first person I ever protected,” says Griffin.


“I’ve told a lot of people about when I was little I carried a BB gun to protect a woman in my family while she walked to the grocery store,” Griffin remembers. “My grandmother was that woman. Nothing compared to how good I felt thinking that I was keeping her safe. It set the stage for everything I have done in life.


“She was also wise, like Elder Michaux, in their example of how you can build your life - including your business - in a way that expresses your spiritual life,” Griffin says.


Since its inception in 2013, within days of Sister Jones’ passing, the Hilda Mae Jones Foundation has operated on donations from businesses, and the tithes of family members.


“The cookout is an opportunity to thank those who have donated, and celebrate the community’s ability to stay connected and strong through the generations,” Griffin says. “It makes sense to start now, and in this place. Four-hundred years ago this year, the first Africans stepped on America’s shores as slaves. They were right near this land.”

Bugs!

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Bug bites

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July 5, 2019


For many people, summer means beaches, barbecues, and bug bites. More of us get outside in the warmer weather and do what feels natural. Many bugs do the same thing.


How do you keep the number of outdoor fun activities up, while safely keeping the number of bug bites down? Health and insect experts have some suggestions.


Avoid certain places. Stay away from stagnant water, which can be a breeding ground for disease-carrying mosquitos. If summer storms create instant ponds, quickly drain them.


Avoid certain behaviors. As much fun as walking barefoot in the grass can be, or wearing perfume, these are activities that can make you more attractive to biting insects. Some research has even shown that drinking beer can be one of several things that make you more attractive to mosquitos.


Travel wisely. If you’re going overseas, make sure you will not be traveling to an area where you may be exposed to insect-borne viruses. Check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines.


Consider insect repellents. Many people are served well by what they lovingly call “bug spray.” However, all sprays are not good for all people, especially children. Carefully research insect repellents, as well as possible alternatives that you may find helpful.


Check with local experts. Don’t forget to ask a variety of experts in your area who may be able to offer specific suggestions. Health care professionals, agricultural and gardening experts, and those familiar with local insect activity are valuable resources.

Security "Professional" From The Start

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New Security Guard

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July 2, 2019


It’s your first day as a security guard. Congratulations! Welcome to the world of security professionals.


Whether this is a job you’re doing temporarily, or starting out on what you hope is a long and distinguished career as a security/law enforcement professional, we want to encourage you to make the most of it.


“Making sure people are safe has been my number one focus for as long as I can remember,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It doesn’t have to be that way for you. But conducting yourself as a professional in whatever you do, wherever you do it, will always serve you well.”


After decades of experience as a security professional and entrepreneur, Griffin knows that professionalism can start on Day 1. He says a security guard gets off to a strong start by:


*Completing the basic training. In some situations a guard can start working before some of the training has been completed. However, if this is your case, make sure you schedule time to complete the training as soon as possible. That can be training required by an authority such as DCJS in Virginia, as well as for your specific company.


*Knowing SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures). The company you work for has SOPs. The specific site where you are assigned will also have its own SOPs, or general operating procedures. Make sure you know them all well, and follow them. If you have concerns about instances where following SOPs may be challenging, do not hesitate to ask questions and get clear answers. Griffin says, “SOPs will guide you through your first few days of work because they explain the company’s do’s and don’ts of site work. SOPs also allow you to enhance your recent unarmed/armed classroom training.”


*Showing up on time. This is one of the biggest reasons why people in a wide variety of industries lose their jobs. Many business owners, site supervisors, and workforce experts will tell you that people who regularly show up on time get opportunities other workers don’t. According to a Career Trend article: “Consistently arriving to work on time demonstrates commitment and consideration for the people you work with, and the company that employs you. The benefits of being punctual include your ability to build positive and productive working relationships with your supervisor and peers. It also means you gain desirable traits that employers value and that you can perform your assigned job tasks within the allotted time.”


*Effectively handling administrative tasks. Make sure you sign in, or log in, as instructed. Make sure that any required reports, such as incident reports, are handled in a timely fashion, and are completed as required. Again, make sure these things are done as required by SOPs. Often when there are discrepancies about pay amounts and dates, it turns out that the guard was not clear about pay information outlined in the SOPs, did not sign in or out properly, did not file required paperwork appropriately, or some combination of these issues.


*Completing additional training. Additional training helps you stay sharp, as well as advance in your career. For example, you may be certified as an unarmed security officer, and get further training for armed security work in order to get more assignments, earn more money, or be better positioned for a law enforcement position.


“Starting out in the security field can feel overwhelming at times, because you know you are responsible for someone’s property, their life, or your own life could be at risk,” Griffin says. “If you feel that way that’s good. It means you’re serious about your responsibility.


“The best way to get through moments of being overwhelmed is to remember that you’ve got what it takes to do the job, and be wise enough to know what you don’t know. Ask questions. Ask your security supervisors. Check your SOPs. Ask more experienced members of the security team you’re working with,” Griffin says.

Kids And Cars

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Family car

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June 28, 2019


This is the time of year when millions of people across the U.S. will pack everyone into the car and set off on vacation. Unfortunately, too many situations where kids are in, or around, cars in the summer aren’t nearly as funny as the famous summer vacation road trip movie.


According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, “deaths of children younger than 13 in motor vehicle crashes have declined since 1975, but crashes still cause 1 of every 4 unintentional injury deaths.”


Children are also tragically killed or injured when they are hit by a vehicle in a driveway or parking lot. In fact, toddlers are often victims of “frontovers,” where a driver can’t see the child in front of the car. Every car has a front blind spot.


Keep kids safe this summer, and all year long, when they are in, or around, your vehicle. Experts suggest several strategies, including:


Put kids in their place. Children 13 and under should always ride in the back seat. They should be in the appropriate seat until they are 4 feet 9 inches and heavier than weight recommendations for their car seat or booster seat, which usually happens between 8 and 12 years of age.


Use the right seat. Speaking of car seats and booster seats, make sure you are using the right one for your child’s age, height, and weight. Make sure it is properly secured in your vehicle before every trip.


Keep your eyes on them. Children, especially younger ones, are very much “in the moment.” They might follow someone outside to say goodbye, run out from between cars in a parking lot, or any number of quick, unplanned movements. Give them age-appropriate lessons about being safe around cars, but don’t count on them remembering at all times.


Secure items in your vehicle. People who travel with children often have several items on hand to make the trip more enjoyable, which may even include a pet. Plus luggage that can include gear for special activities. Make sure everything is secured, or stored, in ways that keep them from flying if you should happen to slam on the brakes or are in an accident.


Take your time when checking your vehicle before you leave. An extra few minutes considering these reminders could save you a lot of heartache.


Have a great, and safe, summer road trip!


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A Clean Start

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A clean start

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June 25, 2019


A recent poll made news by revealing that half of Americans used a swimming pool instead of taking a shower.


We hope security professionals take a real shower or bath before they go to work!


“Security work can often include a significant amount of walking, dressing in hot suits or uniforms, and then rushing from one location to another,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “You can get sweaty, so good hygiene is important.


Griffin suggests security pros start their first shift of the day, or first in a series of shifts, with a good shower or bath.


Dermatologists and other hygiene experts suggest the best ways to shower, as well as ways to get the most out of basic shower time.


There are also suggested ways to care for your skin while showering, such as shorter shower time and with cooler water, as well as ways to pay more attention to parts of the body you may be neglecting (like your belly button).


“Yes, there will be times when you are sweaty, but have to get to your next site,” says Griffin, “but that doesn’t mean your professionalism has to be overshadowed by your strong scent.”


Take time to research the many available products that can help you make the most of a quick stop in a nearby restroom.


Griffin suggests having backup work clothes available, such as a clean shirt and whatever else helps you feel your best. Uniforms may benefit by being cleaned using these tips for cleaning workout clothes, but start with the manufacturer’s care instructions. It is important for the uniform to be fresh and clean at the beginning of your work period.


“It may be a little hard to believe,” Griffin says, “but when you start your shift totally sharp and clean, it contributes to your professional presence.”


Note: Links to products are for informational purposes only. We do not endorse, or benefit from, any product linked to in this post.

Safeguard Your Small Business

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Woman business owner presents

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June 21, 2019


Are you making a living running your own business? Whether you call yourself an entrepreneur, solo-preneur, small business owner, freelancer, consultant, or any other title, you and your business are very dependent upon each other.


There’s a lot to think about. We hope safety is on their minds. Why? If something happens to you, it happens to your business. If something happens to your business, it happens to you.


“I’ve met entrepreneurs who have their specific service or expertise covered, have insurance, online security, and great partners or employees,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “but they didn’t think about physical security until something happened. They cut corners to save a little time or money, but it cost them much more in the long run.”


Griffin suggests you:

*Trust your instincts. When you do not feel safe with certain customers, clients, or partners, have a process in place to handle the situation. Be ready with things you can say or do to professionally but clearly handle likely scenarios, and someone you can immediately report the encounter to.

*Safely transport money. When you have to make a deposit or withdrawal at a financial institution, make sure you have a secure system for transporting the funds. While working, or on personal time, do not “flash” cash or credit cards.

*Have a safe space. Make sure any area you frequent does not pose a physical hazard (falling, tripping, having furniture or equipment fall on you, etc.).

*Mind your electronics. Make sure you are not overloading the electrical system in your workspace, especially when using extension cords.

*Get a security system. This includes an alarm system, security cameras, and a thoughtfully placed panic button that connects to local police. Consider including the ability to “buzz” people in, if appropriate, as well as the ability to see the person before you hit the buzzer.

*Check your security system. If you already have a system, check it regularly to make sure it is working properly. You want to know it will be ready if you need it.

*Connect locally. Connect with other entrepreneurs in your area to find ways to pool resources to make sure you are all more secure. For example, it may be more affordable and sensible to hire a security company and/or security systems for the area where you are all located.

*Connect more broadly. Connect with the local Small Business Administration office, SCORE, Freelancers Union, your local Chamber of Commerce, or other organizations that offer a wide variety of valuable supports to small business owners.

*Have fire extinguishers, and smoke/carbon monoxide detectors. Make sure they are operational by changing batteries, checking expiration dates, or whatever protocol is specified by the manufacturer.


There are also earlier posts on this page with personal safety tips for you and your family. As the old saying goes, “better safe than sorry.”


Note: Links to products are for informational purposes only. We do not endorse, or benefit from, any product linked to in this post.

A Security Pro's Best Weapon: Words.

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A security pro's best weapon: words.

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June 18, 2019


“A security professional’s biggest weapon is his or her mouth,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “You can often defuse a situation verbally.”


How police officers talked to, and drew their weapons on, a family in Phoenix, Arizona prompted a meeting of community members, police, and city officials scheduled for tonight in the city. No one was killed during the incident.


“I never want to second-guess how someone handles their security role,” says Griffin, “However, this is an opportunity to stress the power of appropriately talking to people in security situations. The tone and volume of your voice and your body language don’t lose their importance just because you’re in a security position. In fact, they’re even more important.”


As in many other cities, Phoenix police are looking at the ways they deal with the public. Communities of color and poor communities across the nation have long said they are unfairly targeted, and treated less humanely. Many police officers view things differently.


“So much goes back to training,” Griffin says. “First, make sure you weed out people who are just on power trips. Those who are on the force must be required to keep their skills sharp, and not just their ability to shoot.


“If you keep going to your weapon when dealing with people, that means you don’t have the proper training,” says Griffin. “That’s an easy fix.


“It must be said that even under the best of circumstances, and first responders do everything right, things can still go horribly wrong.


“Our hearts break for those who feel victimized by security professionals, as well as for security professionals or first responders of any type who lose their lives or health while serving the community. It does happen,” says Griffin. “I’d like these incidents, and every situation where a security professional needs more than forceful words, to be rare.”

Flag Day

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Flag Day 2019

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June 14, 2019


On this day in 1777, according to history.com, the Second Continental Congress “passed a resolution stating that ‘the flag of the United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white,’ and that ‘the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.’”


On July 4, 1960, the flag we salute today was raised for the first time by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.


Flag etiquette, rules and guidelines include specific times and ways to display the flag, not allowing it to touch the ground (or anything beneath it), and destroying it in a dignified manner.


To honor their service to the nation, a flag drapes the coffin of deceased veterans and is presented to their next of kin after the service. The flag can also be used in this way for other patriotic Americans, but there is a cost.


A light-hearted celebration of the flag is scheduled for today in Washington. Famed magician David Copperfield plans to mark this Flag Day by restoring a star to the Smithsonian’s Star-Spangled Banner. That flag flew over Baltimore’s Fort McHenry during the War of 1812, and inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem that became our national anthem.

The Human Element

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The human element in security

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June 11, 2019


Security guards are often in the news. There are times when a security person’s actions are questioned for being too much, or too little. When a guard is a crime victim, or considered a hero who thinks they were just doing their job. Sometimes paying a price for doing that job.


There are also advancements in technology that have had security experts talking for months about robots replacing human security officers. They, and other technologies, can work very well together. But could tech totally replace a sharp man or woman on a walkie-talkie?


“I can’t imagine that ever happening,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “As long as there are humans, they will want other humans to be at least part of whatever it is that helps them feel secure. I agree with the people who say things like human empathy, the ability to quickly adjust to a situation, and human experience can’t easily be replaced.


“Well trained security guards know how to position themselves, patrol an area, report activity, and respond to incidents in ways that deter, contain or effectively resolve most incidents,” Griffin says.


For example, there is evidence that in 2016, the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, was the scene of a deadly mass shooting because security was too tight at the shooter’s original destination.


“The best security professionals have a combination of things that make them very hard to replace,” says Griffin. “Their skills stay sharp, they have good instincts about people and situations, they take care of their health, and they have a willingness to serve.


“We don’t hear about the countless problems security professionals face every day,” Griffin says. “That’s exactly the way most security professionals want it to be. That means they took care of them.”

Hydrate!

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Hydrate!

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June 7, 2019


You hear it all the time from weather forecasters - especially in the summer - fitness instructors, and maybe even friends and family.


Hydrate, hydration, dehydration. They are all about having enough water in your body. To hydrate and hydration are about replacing water in the body. Dehydrated and dehydration are about not having enough water, and symptoms can include headache and a sweet tooth.


It may not look like it, but our bodies are mostly made up of water. Every cell of your body needs water to function properly. Water helps you maintain your body temperature, remove waste, and keep your joints lubricated.


What does hydration have to do with safety? Being well hydrated is one of the simplest and easiest things you can do to stay healthy, and being physically healthy can help you stay safe.


In earlier posts we’ve talked about warm weather activities like sports, boating, and camping. People who are dehydrated can have medical emergencies that may put their lives at risk, and possibly the lives of others.


What if you have to move quickly to avoid danger, fight off an attacker, or warn others? What if you have to help someone else? Even if you are physically fit, your ability to effectively function can be severely limited if you are not well hydrated.


Speaking of fitness, athletes are especially encouraged to watch their fluid intake. A study in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition showed that individualized hydration plans help athletes improve their performance and recovery time.


Not a big water fan? Let your meals help you out. Add more fluids with hydration-friendly foods like oatmeal, milk, and salad. Check out this list of water-rich foods. Many are fruits and vegetables that are at the peak of ripeness right now, making them even tastier.


You can also cut down on alcohol and caffeine, which contribute to dehydration.


Drinking appropriate amounts of water every day may seem like a little thing, but it’s a big deal for your health.

Bring Your Whole Self To Your Work

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Bring your whole self to your work

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June 4, 2019


“I always count on my faith,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “and sometimes it’s funny how even the smallest things have been big miracles in my security work.


“During a hot summer several years ago, I travelled to Miami, Florida with my client,” Griffin remembers. “We had meetings with a variety of community leaders across the state, plus the Vice President of the United States while he was in the area.”


Griffin says there was a significant security presence throughout the trip, and he even called on a seasoned colleague based in New York City for assistance.


“While preparing to leave for the meeting with the Vice President, my client decided to change his socks to ones of a different color. The client checked the luggage but could not find them, and I had not packed them.


“I was nervous, but took a breath and reached into the same suitcase pocket my client had checked. I pulled out a pair of socks, and did it again, and again. Every time was a different color. We were both in awe,” Griffin recalls with a laugh. “We went to the meeting in good spirits.


“That night, just as other nights when a client’s life had been threatened, or there’d been a security problem that was safely resolved, I dropped to my knees and prayed,” says Griffin.


“It’s important to bring your whole self to your work, whatever your work is,” Griffin says. “Bring your faith. Lean on it, but don’t use it to judge or discriminate against others. Use your faith to connect, to build bridges. Also use your instincts, and your good sense.


“I believe that if you always combine faith, instincts, and intelligence with good training you can succeed.”

Our Hearts Are With Our Virginia Beach Neighbors

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Deadly Virginia Beach shooting

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June 1, 2019


“Our hearts and prayers are with the families that lost loved ones, and for the rapid recovery of those who were injured, in yesterday’s horrible shooting at the Virginia Beach Municipal Building,” said Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“Virginia Beach is a beautiful place filled with people we have had the great pleasure of working with for many, many years,” Griffin said. “We pray that as we learn more about what happened, we will have opportunities to celebrate the lives of those lost too soon as well as the strength of the entire community.”

Get Serious About Playground Safety

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Get serious about playground safety

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May 31, 2019


As kids spend more time enjoying playgrounds, taking advantage of the higher temperatures and extra daylight hours, make sure they don’t spend more time getting hurt.


“Each year, more than 200,000 children go to U.S. hospital emergency rooms with injuries associated with playground equipment,” according to the US Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC).


In some cases, children lose their lives in playground equipment accidents at school, or because of problems with clothing. Kids may even use equipment inappropriately, not realizing how dangerous that can be.


According to CPSC researchers and other experts, many of these painful situations can be avoided. Playgrounds can be made safer with:


Supervision. Adults who can clearly keep their eyes on children in their care, especially the youngest ones, can help them use equipment properly. Adults can also help children avoid a variety of potentially dangerous situations.


Rules About Behavior. Kids should know that they have to share and take turns on playground equipment. They should make sure the coast is clear before jumping, swinging, and sliding. They should also use equipment designed for their age, and use it properly for the safest experience. For example, it might seem like a good idea to go head-first down a sliding board pretending to be a flying superhero, but that is not the safest way to go.


Proper Clothing. Make sure kids wear shoes at all times. Clothes should not have drawstrings, or very loose parts that can get caught on equipment. This includes jewelry. Remove bike helmets while using playground equipment.


Proper Ground Surfaces. According to the National Safety Council, playground surfaces should be made up of “12 inches of wood chips, mulch, sand or pea gravel, or mats made of safety-tested rubber or rubber-like materials.” They should not have anything sticking up through them, including sharp parts of the equipment.


Well-Maintained Equipment. Make sure playground authorities properly install and maintain the equipment. Whoever supervises the child(ren) should also make sure pieces are not too broken, loose, wet, or hot to be used safely.

Don't Trust. Train!

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Security pros must get good training

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May 28, 2019


“When I first started out I took a class and trusted the instructor, only to find out later that I was misinformed about something,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It never happened again.”


Griffin encourages anyone interested in the security field to take the trainings required by the state where they will work as an armed or unarmed security professional. In Virginia, for example, the authority is the Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS).


Federal officers are hired by the federal government, and require extensive training and background checks.


“Some guards are training incorrectly,” Griffin says. “But how would they know? Ask questions. Read the rules and regulations. The instructor’s opinions don’t matter. It’s about the law.”


There are almost always news reports where a security officer’s training is questioned. An NBA star is asked for identification, a guard is attacked at a restaurant in one part of the country, and elsewhere a guard is involved in a fatal shooting.


“No matter what happens, whether you are an armed or unarmed security professional, you want to be able to count on your training. You want to know that you did everything you could for the best outcome, and do it in a way that is supported by the law,” Griffin says.


When it comes to carrying a concealed weapon - done by some security professionals as well as private citizens - Griffin has additional advice.


“Being licensed to carry a concealed weapon doesn’t mean that you can carry your weapon anywhere you like,” he says. “Knowing the law in your state, and in specific settings, is critical. Some states even allow private citizens to carry a weapon unconcealed, but not every location in that state.


“Once you conceal your weapon, you should have a concealed weapons permit,” Griffin says, “but watch for posted signs on private property. Also know laws not allowing you to carry your weapon into federal buildings, some movie theaters, restaurants, and across some state lines.”


Griffin also reminds every owner of a firearm, whether a security professional or private citizen, to “know how to use, maintain, and store it responsibly.”

Warm Weather and Crime

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Warm weather and crime

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May 24, 2019


For many people in the United States, Memorial Day Weekend marks the unofficial start of summer. They look forward to vacation, outdoor shows and festivals, or just hanging out in the extra hours of sunshine.


However, many people believe summer’s higher temperatures bring higher crime rates. Well, the weather does have an impact on crime rates, and it doesn’t.


A study published in GeoHealth reported that weather’s affect on crime might depend on where you live. It showed that warmer temperatures were likely to be connected to higher crime rates during the winter in areas that have stronger winters. Heat was less likely to spark aggression than it was to bring together crime’s three major ingredients: “a motivated offender, a suitable target, and the absence of a guardian to prevent a violation of the law.”


Researchers and others say the weather-crime connection is worth continuing to dig into, especially since the nation’s murder rate started climbing again.


The New York Times reported that the murder rate rose in 2015 and 2016, after falling for 25 years. The paper called for considering a variety of factors that could have contributed to the increase in gun violence in particular during that period, such as the weather. The Times report stated that temperatures were higher on average in those two years than they were in 2014, when the murder rate reached a modern low. The report detailed the Times’ close look at 10 cities, and states, "Shootings generally increased in nine of the 10 cities as temperatures rose.”


The Times also reported, “Why the rise in shootings during warmer weather? Mostly because people are outside more.”


Whether you’re inside or outside in warm weather, the drop in safety-minded behavior warm weather can bring is a challenge. Change that by taking steps to avoid being what the GeoHealth report called “a suitable target.”


Be a hard target. Walk with assertiveness and confidence when going to work or school, or running errands.


Stick with basic safety tips. Walking or running alone early in the morning or late at night, leaving your car unlocked, and displaying your cash can all make you a potential target for a criminal. It may be challenging to stick with these old-fashioned tips, but they still work.


Look out for parent traps. When parents are out alone with children, their focus is on the children. Makes sense, but it can also make them targets. That’s especially true for moms traveling alone. Make sure you follow Parents magazine tips like protecting your purse, especially at the food court. Don’t wear headphones, don’t feel pressured to talk to strangers, and be prepared to leave any area when you feel unsafe.


Get older and wiser. Criminals often view seniors as easy targets, but they don’t have to be. Senior safety tips include keeping door and window locks working and in use even if you are at home, don’t open the door to anyone you don’t know, don’t give out personal and financial information to someone who calls you on the phone, and have any regular money you receive (like a Social Security or pension check) directly deposited into your bank account.

Vehicles and VIPs

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Safe vehicles can mean safe VIPs

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May 21, 2019


If you are - or wind up being - a security professional who works with a VIP, especially a celebrity at the height of their career, you may take a lot of trips in a limousine or some other luxury vehicle. These vehicles attract fans and others to the celebrity you are protecting. In many cases, that’s fine.


However, there are times when the celebrity would like to run errands, or relax for an evening, without attracting attention. This may mean using another vehicle, and that vehicle could even be yours.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin has been there.


Griffin was working security for an event in the Richmond, Virginia area several years ago, when one of the celebrity guests needed a break. He and the celebrity’s assistant came up with the idea of an evening at the movies.


“Instead of having the celebrity driven in the stretch limousine, we rode in my personal vehicle,” Griffin says. “We were escorted through the back door of the movie theater, and seated quietly in the back row where we watched the featured film.


“When it was over, we rushed the celebrity out the theater’s rear entrance and into my car,” Griffin remembers, “because crowds would certainly have rushed my client. As exciting as it can be to be seen with a well-known celebrity, security professionals should remain as invisible as possible.”


Griffin says it felt good to be able to keep his celebrity client safe while throwing in the special trip. It turns out that the client felt good, too.


“As a result of having a quiet and restful weekend, the client sent me a gift that I have kept to this day.”


That entire experience could have been much more challenging had Griffin not kept his car in shape, which means more than washed and waxed.


Even if you don’t have one of this year’s safest cars, most cars can be safer if they are well maintained. Don’t skip basic car care, such as regular oil changes, replacing fluids, and rotating your tires.


“Having a plain but reliable secondary vehicle during a visit of a famous person or well-known executive, which could be your personal car, can help keep the attention off your client,” says Griffin. “It is also safer for you and your family to ride in, and helps you get to work on time.”

Stalking Victims

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Safety tips for stalking victims

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May 17, 2019


In our most recent post, we talked about security pros responding to stalkers. However, if you or someone you know is being stalked, you need some safety tools of your own.


Security professionals are encouraged to listen when victims report their concerns about being stalked, and take those concerns seriously. Victims are also encouraged to listen. To themselves.


Research shows that stalking is more common than you may think, and it can take a terrible toll on the victim's life. However, the person being stalked does not have to remain a victim. There are several safety strategies that can help.


There may be the tendency to downplay whatever behavior is making you uncomfortable. Don’t! Tell family, friends and co-workers about the situation. If there are security professionals where you work, near your home, or wherever you regularly participate in a community activity, let them know so they can help you be on the lookout for the stalker.


It may also be wise for you to consult security and mental health professionals, as well as a crisis hotline or victim services agency. All of this lets others know what’s going on. If they know, they can help you sort through your feelings, and they may be able to help you create an appropriate action plan.


A good action plan includes not communicating with the stalker, and keeping any evidence of the stalking (such as voicemails and texts). It is also important to change regular routines such as travel between work or school and home. If you feel it’s necessary, don’t hesitate to contact the police and get a court order telling the stalker to stay away from you.


According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, “most victims were commonly stalked by someone of the opposite sex, an intimate partner, or someone else they knew. Stalking tactics can include unwanted phone calls, voice messages and text messages; being approached; or being watched, followed or tracked by the perpetrator. About 68% of female and 70% of male victims experienced threats of physical harm during their lifetime.”


If you are feeling afraid, anxious, unsafe, and changing how you live your life because of someone else’s behavior towards you - even if that someone was once very close to you - you need help. Reaching out for that help is not weak. It is a strong and smart way to take care of yourself.

Stalking and Security Pros

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Stalking and security pros

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May 14, 2019


In the U.S., one in six women and one 19 men, have been pursued by a stalker in their lifetime. A stalker is someone who harasses another person in an aggressive way that is often threatening, and it is illegal.


Sometimes you’ll hear a joking reference to stalking, or having a stalker, but it is no laughing matter. Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin remembers providing security for a high-profile individual who had a stalker.


“During a commercial flight from Virginia to California my client advised me that my client’s male stalker was on the flight, and dressed as a woman. This person was not only stalking my client, but calling radio stations pretending to actually be my client,” Griffin remembers.


“I immediately contacted the captain of the flight, who alerted local police. The police met us at our layover stop to California. The stalker wasn’t committing any crimes on the plane, so the flight continued. The captain did, however, make sure we were seated as far apart as possible for the duration of the flight.”


If you are providing security for someone who is being stalked, Griffin suggests you keep a current picture of the person giving your client any problems (if possible), and keep your security skills sharp. This includes listening closely when you get a complaint about someone’s behavior, and appropriately following-up. Stalking victims often have good instincts, and are encouraged to respect their feelings when any person or situation seems unsafe.


“Some fans will go through extremes to get close to the person they desire,” says Griffin. “They are the most dangerous fans. We also have to remember that stalking often leads to more serious crimes such as assault, kidnapping, or worse.”


Security professionals could face this situation anywhere, because a person doesn’t have to be a celebrity to have a stalker.


Griffin says, “Celebrity stalker court cases, and even murder, make the news. But there are actually more cases of everyday people around the world who are victimized and traumatized by stalkers. Security professionals must have the appropriate training for these types of circumstances.”

Summer Fun: Swimming and Boating

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Safe swimming and boating

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May 10, 2019


We looked at safe ways to enjoy warm weather activities like camping and summer sports in an earlier post. Warm weather can also mean more opportunities to swim, enjoy a boat ride, or both.


Swimming and boating can be very dangerous if not done safely.


According to the World Health Organization, drowning is the “3rd leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide.” In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that about 10 people die every day from an unintentional drowning. And those do not include boating accidents.


In 2017, the U.S. Coast Guard counted “4,291 accidents that involved 658 deaths, 2,629 injuries and approximately $46 million dollars of damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents.”


The Coast Guard also reported that “where cause of death was known, 76% of fatal boating accident victims drowned. Of those drowning victims with reported life jacket usage, 84.5% were not wearing a life jacket.”


In order to improve the odds of you and your loved ones enjoying swimming and boating, use some basic safety precautions.


Take swimming lessons. Learn how to swim at a local YMCA, or other organization that offers Red Cross and other certified swimming instruction.


Follow water and swimming safety guidelines. Basics such as swimming in designated, areas are helpful, even if you are a seasoned swimmer. Also make sure you drink plenty of water, and protect your skin with sunscreen.


Stay focused. Yes, you’re having fun, but many swimming and boating tragedies could have been avoided if people had been paying closer attention. When operating a boat, or letting kids swim and play a backyard pool as part of a party (or any body of water), there must always be focused supervision.


Follow boating safety guidelines. In addition to staying focused, make sure the right life jackets are available for everyone on board and they’re being used. Driving under the influence is not appropriate for motor vehicle drivers, or boat operators. Check out the Coast Guard’s videos and other important information to help you safely enjoy boating.


Adding safety practices to your swimming or boating trip may take more planning time, but it is time well spent because it could save your life or the life of someone you care about.

Split-Second Decision

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Split-second decisions

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May 7, 2019


A recent post pointing out the possible dangers security professionals face when someone has “nothing to lose” also showed us the importance of making a smart, split-second decision.


Making quick decisions can be hard for anyone. In some situations, like security, these decisions can be the difference between life and death.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin knows these decisions may not always be well received in the heat of the moment, but do your best to make sure they are right.


“One of my clients often visited Atlanta,” he remembers. “During one particular visit, many dignitaries traveled from site-to-site throughout the city with my client. We also had a large entourage of Sheriff’s Department Deputies, and state police.


“One particular stop stands out. After leaving a church, one of the dignitaries rushed to catch up with my client while the officers attempted to get my client quickly and safely into a vehicle. The well-known dignitary was stopped and pushed to the ground in seconds. The individual complained to me about being pushed down, and not helped to get up after being identified,” Griffin says.


“In the security field, you will have to make split-second decisions that could hurt the feelings of people you think are important,” Griffin says. “My client’s life was the top priority of the security team members in that moment. They made the right call, and I didn’t mind handling the misunderstanding with the dignitary.”

Summer Fun: Camping and Sports

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Summer fun includes camping and sports

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May 3, 2019


Most of the U.S. is heading into consistently warmer weather. That gives us more opportunities to enjoy outdoor activities, and possibly get hurt. It makes sense to start thinking about the many ways you and your loved ones can have “hot fun in the summertime” while staying safe.


Let’s start with camping and summer sports.


Camping has its own unique challenges, because in most cases there’s only a thin piece of fabric between you and the great outdoors. Smart camping includes safely packing and preparing your food, making sure you have the right clothing for the weather as well as any activities you may have planned, and avoiding wild animals.


If you’re going to have a campfire, think about more than roasting marshmallows. Safety behaviors include thoughtfully locating, building, and extinguishing your campfire.


Make sure you plan to enjoy activities such as hiking during your camping trip. Many of the same personal safety practices you need for relaxed camping activities also apply to organized summer sports.


Those safety practices include staying hydrated (drinking more water than beverages containing sugar and/or alcohol), wearing sunscreen, and properly utilizing whatever equipment is most appropriate for the activity. If you are using specialized clothing or equipment, make sure you are comfortable with it before you really need to use it.


Carefully planning and preparing for warm weather activities such as camping and summer sports help make it more likely you, or someone you care about, will have a safe summer.

Nothing to Lose

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Watch for people with nothing to lose

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April 30, 2019


“A person who feels they have nothing to lose is a person who can be extremely dangerous,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “If you want to be a smart and effective security professional, you need to be aware of the fact that a person like this can come from anywhere, at any time.”


To repeat, this type of person can be extremely dangerous. No matter what your security role - security guard, personal protection for an executive or celebrity, private investigator - you must prepare yourself to face this type of individual one day.


Griffin recalls facing someone like that one summer early in his executive protection career.


“I received word that I would be escorting my client to a small town hall meeting in Santa Monica, California,” Griffin says. “Suddenly during the event, a man in the back of the room stood up and started yelling. I immediately made contact with my client, to ease any concerns he may have had.


“The man started moving closer to the stage, and his yelling escalated. He broke into a full run toward my client, and I could hear him shouting about having AIDS so he was going to die anyway. By then I was running toward him, snatched him up quickly, and brought him outside of the event. Fearing that another person could go after my client, I escorted the individual to police and promptly resumed my post near the stage while checking to make sure there was no blood or anything on me,” Griffin says.


“He actually said it,” Griffin continues, “He was going to die anyway. In other words, he had nothing to lose, so he was going to do what he felt he had to do to make his point.”


At that time, the mid-1990’s, there was a great deal of research and political activity in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Celebrities were among the hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. announcing they had HIV/AIDS, and according to government statistics it had become the leading cause of death for all Americans ages 25 to 44.


By 1996, the number of new AIDS cases diagnosed in the U.S. declined for the first time since the first official report on the epidemic in 1981, it was no longer the leading cause of death for all Americans 25-44. However, it remained the leading cause of death for African Americans in that age group.


“These days someone can senselessly attack any place at any time, even houses of worship,” Griffin says. “It’s important for security professionals to be on their toes, and help everyone become more security conscious.”

To Drink, or Not to Drink?

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drunk-driving

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April 26, 2019


Before today is over, almost 30 people in the United States will die in an accident that could have been avoided. How? No drunk-driving.


The number of people killed in drunk-driving accidents across the nation has dropped over the years, but according to statistics from 2017, drunk-driving crashes still kill more than 10,000 people every year. Drinking is also linked to a variety of crimes, including 37% of rapes and sexual assaults.


You’ve probably heard all the bad stuff about drunk-driving for most of your life. Hopefully that information has kept you from driving when you’ve had too much to drink, or from letting anyone else drive drunk. If they insist on driving, do your best to change their mind, and don’t ride with them if you can’t. Remember, you can’t always tell when someone is too drunk to drive, so it’s better to play it safe.


There are other reasons to cut down or quit drinking. If you’re dieting, alcohol has hundreds of calories that you don’t need. There’s an old expression, “Don’t drink your calories.” If you have a health condition that is made worse by drinking, don’t drink. You may also be taking medication that should not be mixed with alcohol.


“People don’t always realize that they make small decisions every day that can be the difference between being safe and unsafe,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “Cutting down on the amount of alcohol they drink, or not drinking at all, is a big one.”

Stay Focused

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Stay focused

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April 23, 2019


If you’re a security professional, one of the best things you can do for yourself and those you serve is to admit that there are times when your head is not in the game. Once you admit that, you can find ways to stay focused.


Here are a few common challenges, and ways to handle them:

Fatigue. You may be the type of security person who works a lot of hours, maybe working for more than one company at a time. What to do: Build in times for rest. Lack of sleep can hurt your ability to think clearly and quickly, as well as cause serious health problems.


Routine. You may work the same location for extended hours, and/or over an extended period of time. You get used to the way things always are, and the people who are always there. What to do: Switch things up. When possible, build in times to walk, sit down, break, or check in that are different from your usual way of doing things. Change your route, build in several seconds for stretching or quick exercises, and change your shift.


Overwhelm. You may find yourself in a situation where there are hundreds of people, or even thousands, who you work hard to closely monitor because any one of them could pose a security risk. This can be especially difficult for a new security professional. The idea of being responsible for someone else’s safety, or important property, can also feel like a great deal of responsibility that you’re concerned about your ability to handle. What to do: Talk to other security professionals about your concerns and ways they’ve handled them, study security procedures, and take care of your physical and mental health.


Distractions. Places that become routine are also great places for distractions. It’s easy to start spending too much time talking to staff members or regular customers, or narrow your area of responsibility more than is advisable or safe. You might find yourself developing a personal relationship with someone, and find yourself paying close attention to them. What to do: Make time to refocus. These types of distractions can lead to significant professional and personal problems. You may want to consider some of the changes suggested above, especially speaking to a more seasoned security professional about ways to handle your personal challenges.


Also distracting are situations where there are local or national celebrities. You may be providing security for them, or a place where they show up for any reason. Don’t react to who they are in ways that keep you from being the security professional you are.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin spent several years providing security for famous people. Getting used to being around someone famous is one of many ways working with them can be distracting.


“I worked with an artist who I accompanied on tour for 18 months,” he recalls. “During a break in that tour, I escorted my artist to a weekend event at a Virginia Beach nightclub with Missy Elliott, Lil’ Kim, a host of bodyguards, and local radio personalities.


“One of the radio personalities made it a point to let those that surrounded us know that she was willing to sleep with a particular NBA basketball player. I don’t know what ever happened, but situations like that create an energy that can have a negative effect on the security environment,” says Griffin. “People can start trying to make requests like hers happen in ways that move security personnel out of important positions, her request could have started a fight for some reason, or something unimaginable can happen.”


Griffin says, “Distractions while working will present themselves in various ways. Not staying focused could cause the loss of your job, your entire career, and possibly even your or your client’s life. Stay focused.”

Grief in Oklahoma City

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Oklahoma City National Memorial

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April 19, 2019


“During my first year as the head of security for a high-profile individual, I was notified of a bombing in Oklahoma,” remembers Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “I prepared for a visit to the bombing site without knowing what to really expect, so I braced for the worst.


“When I arrived with my client, we immediately went to visit survivors. I then learned that we would be attending funerals of some of those who were killed in the blast,” Griffin says.


The morning of April 19, 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was bombed by a former Army soldier. The devastating attack claimed 168 lives, including 19 children in the building’s childcare facility. Hundreds of others were injured.


“I’ll never forget the sadness in the room of each funeral,” Griffin says. “I found myself staring at the deceased and becoming overwhelmed with grief. Caring for the most vulnerable people is why I wanted to be a security professional. Seeing people in so much pain, made victims by something so senseless and horrible, it almost overwhelmed me. I worked hard to find a way to leave my emotions in my hotel room. It was very hard.


“These types of trips soon became the norm as tragedy struck throughout the country during my tenure with that client. But it was in Oklahoma City where I learned how to deal with my personal emotions, and stay alert during unusual circumstances.”


Griffin’s suggestions for handling emotionally-charged circumstances include:

Know yourself. Make time to consider situations that are, or could be, especially meaningful for you. For example, if you are a parent, a situation involving a child that reminds you of your own child may be an emotional trigger of some type. Ask yourself how you would handle the situation.


Practice. Find ways to practice your response in situations that are emotional triggers, or out of your regular routine. For example, if you guard a reception area or store that is usually calm, how would you respond if someone entered and suddenly became violent? Or if there is a medical emergency, or a fire? It’s one thing to know a policy or practice in your head. It’s another thing to actually do it when the situation occurs.


Prepare. Get as much information as you can about a situation you may enter before you get there. That’s a lot easier with today’s technology than it was in 1995, and can often be done fairly quickly. Preparation also means making sure you are well rested, fed, and comfortably dressed from the moment you start working.

Richmond Now & Then

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The view from our Richmond, VA office.

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April 16, 2019


“Opening our Richmond, Virginia, office this week brings back a special memory,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“It was at a Richmond hotel in the mid-1990’s where I met the late Winnie Mandela, the activist and second wife of Nelson Mandela. He, of course, was South Africa’s first democratically-elected President and Nobel Prize Winner,” he recalls. “I was hired to coordinate security for Mrs. Mandela and TV Judge Joe Brown. They were featured speakers at one of the National Black Student Leadership Development Conferences started by Dean Carroll Hardy of The College of William & Mary.


“To be in the presence of Winnie Mandela, Judge Brown and the first black governor of Virginia at one event, L. Douglas Wilder, was very special,” Griffin says. “After her speech, I escorted Mrs. Mandela back to her suite where I was asked to enter her room. She motioned me over to where she was sitting. She gave me a kiss and hug, and thanked me for keeping her safe during her visit to Richmond.”


That type of moment helped keep Griffin going. His new company, Griffin’s Executive Protection Agency (which grew into Leumas Security Services), had already expanded to a team of more than 50 people with clients all over the world. He ran the company while traveling with clients for years at a time, taking few days off.


“I had to use every experience I had to manage my extremely hectic schedule,” Griffin says. “I can’t tell anyone else how to live on the road and run a business successfully, but I can say you need confidence, determination, and the ability to put your life experiences to good use.”


If you are in the Richmond, Virginia, area and are ready to put your life experiences to good use while building a security career, contact us.


Prom Safety

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Prom safety

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April 12, 2019


It’s prom season. Now through June, high school juniors and seniors across the US will be planning, getting excited about, and attending the prom.


Make time to check out online and other resources designed to help you, your teen, and/or the teens in your care have a prom night that is safe enough to create a wonderful memory that will last a lifetime.


For Schools: Set the pace. From the planning until everything’s cleaned up, school administrators and teachers build awareness, set policies, and share information in ways that make sure safety is a top priority.


For Parents: Do more than pay. It’s often hard for many teens to believe, but parents have a greater impact on them than they may know. Use it. Let your teen know how much you trust him or her, and discuss as many prom night details as possible. Include the risks. You don’t need to do it all in one conversation.


For Students: Fun and safety DO mix. Driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or even too little sleep can be dangerous. The One Bad decision video quickly makes that important point. You DO NOT have to do anything you don’t want to do, or that doesn’t feel safe. That includes being with certain people, drugs, alcohol, sex, and anything else that doesn’t feel right for you at the time.


It’s only a great prom night if your teen, your teen's date, and your teen's friends all get home safely and feel good about the experience. How else will they have a chance to talk about and remember it?


Staying Well Can Mean Staying Safe

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Staying well can mean staying safe

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April 9, 2019


“Ignoring the body’s warning signs will certainly do you in,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “and if you’re a security professional, that could also be bad for the people and property you’re protecting. Do your best to make sure that doesn’t happen.”


A tough experience early in his personal protection career helped Griffin learn that lesson.


“We were traveling from California to New York, and frequent trips to Chicago then, too,” Griffin remembers. “During one of the Chicago stops I had a temperature of 103, and couldn’t keep down any food. What I could eat quickly came out of the other end. Dehydrated and completely exhausted, I continued my assignment until my body just quit.


“I waited until a backup security team arrived before taking a bathroom break in my client’s office. I passed out while using the bathroom. When I awoke, I arranged to leave the event I was working, and was driven to a place where I could rest and recover,” Griffin says. “Two great things happened: the person who drove me away is now a good friend, and I was scared into learning the importance of taking care of myself.”


Taking care of yourself includes:

Seeing your doctor. Get regular check-ups, and make time to get medical attention as soon as possible after you notice a change in your health status. For example, a fever accompanied by a severe headache or persistent vomiting.


Dressing appropriately. Check the weather forecast for wherever you are working, and make sure you have clothing that will keep you as comfortable as possible. This includes your footwear. “Too often I worked in shoes that did not give my feet enough support, and suits that were heavier than necessary,” Griffin says. “That puts a lot of unnecessary strain on your body.”


Eating a healthy diet. This may seem hard to do because of your schedule, food availability, and budget. However, most times a little research and planning will support your ability to make healthier food choices. Working around nothing but fast-food restaurants? Most of them have healthier options on their menus these days. You just need to choose them. Talk to your doctor about vitamins and other supplements that can also help you stay healthy.


Griffin says it is very important for security personnel to have as much control over a situation as possible. "The healthier you are in body, mind and spirit,” he says, “the better you are at controlling situations in ways that keep people safe, including yourself.”


School Trip Safety

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School trip safety

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April 5, 2019


“All kinds of things happen on school trips that parents never hear about,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “That is why I encourage parents to have their own security for their child, or get together to hire a security officer (or officers). A traveling officer would be dedicated to the group as a whole, and find a security company anywhere you are staying overnight to keep an eye on things while everyone is asleep.”


Griffin says the security is not just to handle threats from outside of the group on the school trip, but inside the group as well. One of his most memorable school trip security experiences involved a group of 13- and 14-year-olds.


“One of the boys had a sheet tied to the balcony railing, and was climbing down to a girl’s room. The girl was pulling him in. As he entered the balcony, we were knocking on the door,” Griffin recalls. “So he was willing to die to get to the girl’s room? He was young. He probably didn't even think.”


Griffin shares these school trip safety measures:

The first step in preparing for your child’s school trip starts with researching the area your child is visiting. Check to see if you have any trusted relatives and/or friends there, or nearby. Get the phone number of the local police/sheriff department where your child is traveling. Check the weather forecast as far into your child’s expected stay as possible.


Make sure the school's safety policy for trips is appropriate, and enforced.


Refill medicines, pack them appropriately, and include your child in this process. Make chaperones aware of the medications as well as any allergies that your child may have. 


Make sure your child’s cell (mobile) phone is charged, and they have their charger. Also send your child on the trip with extra batteries, or a pre-charged battery pack.


Have a state identification card for your child, with a picture, and make sure all information is current.


Make sure your child has cash. More importantly, make sure your child has a prepaid credit card for emergencies, such as getting back home. As a backup plan, you may want to consider a ride-sharing service’s app on your child’s phone with enough money on account for a trip.


Make sure the hotel (motel, bed-and-breakfast, etc.) where your child’s group is staying has good ratings. Check out the tour company, if one is used, and make sure you are comfortable with the adult chaperones.


Have addresses to every location that your child is visiting, in case your child gets lost between sites.


“No one can guarantee that these safety measures, or any others, will keep your child 100% safe,” says Griffin, “but they will make it a lot easier for your child to have a great trip while you have more peace of mind.”


Road Ready

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Be road ready

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April 2, 2019


Travel in, and to, the US is expected to slow a bit over the coming months, but millions of people will still be happy to get, as Willie Nelson sings, “on the road again.”


For professionals handling personal security travel can pose additional challenges, as Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin knows from experience.


“My client was scheduled to go on tour with other artists on a major record label,” Griffin remembers. “As I prepared for us to travel to London, England, I was excited, because this would be my first time going overseas.


“We got to the hotel, and then had to get ready for our first show. So, I skipped lunch and immediately went to the venue. After returning from the show later that evening I realized that I’d really worked up an appetite. I ordered room service: bacon cheeseburger with fries and a Coke. Once room service arrived I asked how much. It cost $75 American dollars! This was a true moment of panic, because I didn’t plan to spend a lot for meals every day. In order to complete the tour without skipping meals I had to eat at an American fast food restaurant to help keep my budget in check.”


Griffin offers a few quick tips for anyone who wants to be road ready:

Manage your money. Budget, shop around for travel deals (and give yourself enough time to do so), and “If you are traveling abroad, make sure you know the value of your currency (American Dollar) compared to the country that you are traveling to,” he says. And make sure you have a safe and comfortable way to carry your money, credit/debit cards, and ID.


Pack right, not just light. Research ways to help you pack everything you feel you’ll need for your trip.


Be smart about how you’re getting there. Trips are not just about the destination. The way you get there is part of the experience. Take a few minutes to research ways to safely and more easily navigate your plane, train, or automobile travel, even if you have done it several times before. Things change. Be prepared.


“I love to travel, and encourage other people to do it,” Griffin says. “When you put in a little time to plan a safe experience for everyone, you’re much more likely to have a great memory that will last a lifetime.”


Show Time!

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it's show time!

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March 29, 2019


Some of this year’s biggest concert tours are just getting started. Thousands of people will be enjoying these shows. You might be one of them. No matter how large or small a public event you plan to attend, add a bit of safety to your showtime outfit.


“Most people can’t afford to hire personal security to take care of them when they attend a public event,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “but there are other things they can do to help them enjoy themselves and get home safely.”


Griffin suggests you:

Know the exits. Where are the exits, and how far are they from where you are? Are there other places in the venue that could work as an exit in case of emergency, such as a restroom or kitchen window, or a loading dock?


Get a backstage or VIP pass. If available and you can afford them, these types of passes/tickets often provide safer environments with fewer people crowded together. They cost a little more, but they can be worth it.


Move away from the middle. Can’t afford a special pass? You can still avoid the middle of a crowd at a large concert venue or club. Hang out near the outer edge of the crowd. Most people get hurt during concerts when others start pushing and rushing the stage, or a fight breaks out.


Park safely. When possible, park as close as you can to the concert entrance, especially if it is different from the entrance to the venue and makes it possible for you to leave the area as quickly as possible. It’s hard, but you might also consider leaving the show a little early.


Dress for safety. We know you want to look your best, and there are lots of people with great fashion suggestions, but make sure that whatever you wear is comfortable. “If you have to run for your dear life,” Griffin says, “you won’t want your clothes or shoes to hold you back.”


Remember there’s strength in numbers. Don’t go by yourself to large, public events like concerts. Let others know where you’re going to be. Have a pre-determined meeting place in case any member of your group gets separated, and make sure every group member has every other member’s cell (mobile) phone number. Check in from time to time with family and friends during your outings, especially if you are scheduled to be away overnight.


Have A Backup Plan

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have a backup plan

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March 26, 2019


No matter who you are, or how well you plan, there will come a time when something will go wrong. It is definitely true: expect the unexpected. It can be torn clothing before a major event, a house fire, a medical emergency, or a natural disaster. It will come. So do your best when you plan, which includes having a backup plan.


“I was with a recording artist who was working on an album, when the artist agreed to take a break to honor a short-notice request to do a show in another city,” remembers Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“I was uncomfortable from the moment we arrived at the place where my client was supposed to perform. The promoter’s behavior, team and handling of my client’s fee were all inappropriate. At best. I decided that immediately after the performance, my artist would be moved to a different hotel from the one the promoter arranged. I was able to make that happen by calling someone I worked with in a nearby city. We quickly had a hotel, ground transportation and meal service I could trust. The artist was able to do the show and get back to the recording session ready to work, and I had peace of mind,” says Griffin.


“Always have a backup plan when you’re working,” Griffin warns everyone, especially security professionals, “because life never goes as planned.”


Griffin suggests you:

Plan. The better you plan from the beginning, and include your employer or client in that process, the less likely you are to need a backup plan. Plus, when the backup plan has to kick in, you don’t have to worry about basics because they are already covered. “I knew someone near where my client was going to perform, and had the right, updated phone number ready” Griffin says. “I didn’t have to look for it at the last minute.”


Trust your instincts. If your experience, training and good sense say a situation may not be right, believe them. Be sure to check yourself regularly for biases and fears. “Anyone can have them,” Griffin says, “but professionals know how to check in with themselves and keep training so biases and fears don’t hurt their ability to be trusted and effective.”


Act appropriately. When your backup plan is needed, remain calm and act quickly. “Practice emergency support and escape plans under various conditions,” says Griffin. Those include fires, and active shooter or physically violent person or persons. Security personnel could also practice ways to approach someone who appears to behave suspiciously. That person could be anything from a security threat to someone suffering with a health problem. Too many of these types of incidents can go wrong and make the news.*


“Not having a plan or a backup plan could get you and those around you robbed, hurt, or even killed,” warns Griffin. “Always plan ahead, and have an exit strategy.”


*We share reports of situations security professionals face/faced for informational purposes only. We do not know any of the people involved, and have no recommendations or opinions on these specific situations.


Speaking Up About Sexual Assault

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speak up about sexual assault

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March 22, 2019


Earlier this month the video “Don’t Silence Me” was released. The women responsible for the video want to encourage people who have been victims of sexual assault to speak up.


According to statistics on a U.S. Department of Justice website, 16% of all rapes were reported (12% among college women, with some statistics reporting an overall reporting rate as high as 27%), males tend not to report their victimization, and many factors contribute to why someone - especially a child - may not say anything about their sexual assault or abuse.


The same USDOJ website also reports that 35.8% of sexual assaults occur when the victim is between the ages of 12 and 17. When children do tell what happened to them it is usually to a friend or a sibling. If they tell an adult family member it is usually the mother (depending upon the child’s expected response from her), and if it is a professional it’s most likely a teacher.


What can make speaking up even harder are statistics showing that in 8 out of 10 rape cases, the victim knew the perpetrator.


It may make a difference to the laws of your state whether someone is a sexual predator or a sexual offender. Either way there is a victim, and we must help that victim feel safe enough to tell us what happened and possibly report the crime.


We can:

Get educated. Learn basic safety practices and use them. Learn about the safety issues your child may be facing, get information about ways to handle them, and share what you learn with your child(ren). If your child(ren) is active in sports, church, or the community, make sure there are background checks.


Have conversations. When issues of sexuality, sexual safety and violence prevention come up, take the opportunity to discuss it in a way that’s appropriate for the age and temperament of everyone involved. This also means that no matter how much you know or have experienced, create space to listen to what everyone has to say. Remember the USDOJ report about children reporting sexual assault. They told mom based on the way they thought mom would respond. How mom (or other caring adult) responds during these conversations may make a difference should the need arise.


Consider offenders. A Scientific American article reports statistics showing that 96% of women who report rape or sexual assault were abused by men, but women are also perpetrators. So when you’re sharing information with anyone about ways to stay safe, include tips about not victimizing others.


There are a lot of online resources designed to support sexual assault victims, offenders, and those who care for them. Reach out. Speak up.

Take Care Of Yourself To Take Care Of Your Client

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tips for security professionals

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March 19, 2019


Do you want to be a security professional? Then it is very important for you to take care of yourself in order to take care of your client. Your client can be a retail store where you are serving as an unarmed guard, or a busy celebrity who needs you to provide personal protection. It doesn’t matter. If you are not at your best, you cannot keep doing your best.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin says that if you are serious about a security career, you have to be serious about self care.


“With one client I routinely had 12- to 15-hour days that sometimes ended with migraines,” Griffin says. “Every now and then I would get a break while working, like the time my client visited Los Angeles Lakers great Magic Johnson and his wife Cookie at their home. Our security team was escorted downstairs by a member of the Johnsons’ household staff for an opportunity to recharge a bit. The Johnsons invited us back later that evening for a party that included some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, at that time.


“But later in my career, working with a national recording artist, my ability to work long hours was again put to the test,” Griffin says. “I’d been there when a song or two was recorded, but once I was there for work on a full album. I had to be alert from noon to five or six in the morning every day for several weeks, especially since I had to meet everyone who wanted to enter the studio, and get verbal consent for them to do so. It was tough, but I was tougher.”


To Griffin, being “tough” is about much more than physical strength. Many security professionals make time to work out (if they don’t, they should), but they often forget that recovery time is just as important.


Sleep. Research shows that not getting enough sleep can be hazardous to your health. In fact, there are reports that “being awake for 18 hours straight makes you drive like you have a blood alcohol level of .05 (for reference, .08 is considered drunk),” and sleep deprivation “adversely affects cognitive function such as Reaction Time.” You don’t want to be the security person who falls asleep at the wheel causing a deadly crash, or who is too slow to react to a security crisis.


Manage your work hours, when possible. Working 12 hours a day for seven straight days, or longer, can create an uncontrollable inability to stay awake. Taking pills to stay alert can become addictive, and possibly lead to a dependency on prescription (or other) drugs.


Eat. The body needs fuel for top performance while awake or asleep. The best fuel does not come from energy drinks, coffee, drugs, and alcohol. In fact, those may cause other health challenges, or take away from other healthy habits like your fitness regimen.


Remember that “Burn Out” is real. Every hour of every day there are security professionals on duty somewhere. Good ones are always needed, mostly because the nature of the work is very challenging and getting more challenging every day. Taking care of yourself will help you fight “burn out,” which can send you hopping from one job to another. That may not be satisfying for you, and can be a turn-off to a possible employer in the future.


It is possible to work while sleep deprived, on drugs and various drinks, but not for long. Eventually they will take their toll. Commit to a lifestyle that shows that your life is just as important to you as the lives of those you work hard to protect.


“I’ve been rewarded after long periods of hard work for clients, and blessed to be in situations where I met wonderful people like the woman who is now my wife and business partner, Imani Harris-Griffin,” says Samuel Griffin, “but there were times when it was incredibly hard. I hope that by sharing some of my stories I can make this very important work easier for someone else.”

Safety Standards For Adolescents

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Safety standards for adolescents

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March 15, 2019


You know children need guidance and support long after they leave toddler-sized clothing, but as they get older they become more sure of their ability to navigate life’s ups and downs without adults. Meanwhile, some parents become less sure about how to balance their growing child’s need for independence with genuine concerns for the child’s safety.


The FBI and the United Nations are tracking those who commit violent crimes against children, and are working to find ways to combat this behavior. But recent news reports about beloved musical artists and clergy allegedly abusing children, not to mention other possible child predators, have many parents feeling as if their worst nightmares have (or may) become reality.


There are ways to help the adolescent(s) in your life, defined by the World Health Organization as those between 10 and 19 years of age, avoid predators, including:


Have conversations. When you talk about their lives, their friends and their hobbies, it’s easier to start a conversation about tougher subjects like safety. Look for tips about ways to handle these types of conversations.


Let the phone and clothing help you. If you get the adolescent a phone, get one with a tracking app, or install one. Tracking can also be done with devices that can be inserted into clothing, or a wearable accessory.* Research ones that would be best for your situation. 


Let the vehicle help you. If they have a car, or access to one, consider installing a tracking device.* Again, do some research before you take this step.


Have up-to-date photos and identification. It’s easy with today’s cell phones and social media activity to have up-to-date photos. Remember to make sure the best photos are not on the adolescent’s phone. Many schools have ID requirements, but others don’t. Take advantage of opportunities to get identification for your child. If a child is missing, his or her photo and last location are the keys to locating him or her quickly.


Being prepared, and preparing your child, is always the best way to stay ahead of whatever safety challenges you and your family may face.


*We share this information to help you start your own research. We do not recommend any specific device(s), and do not benefit from sharing these links.

Learn From Your Mistakes

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learn from mistakes

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March 12, 2019


No one wants to make a mistake. Ever. Unfortunately, it’s part of being human. You will make mistakes. The challenge is to make sure you learn from those mistakes.


“Sometimes a mistake can get you down,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It’s not about how hard you get knocked down, but it’s about getting back up.”


Early in his career doing celebrity and executive protection, Griffin made an embarrassing mistake.


“It was during a trip to New York City in the winter of 1996,” he recalls. “My client met with Barbra Streisand at her home. She invited us to her upcoming event at Madison Square Garden. I was responsible for our carrying our credentials to the televised event, which included tickets for specific seats.


“The evening of the show we took the unusual step of catching a cab, and when we got to the multi-talented star’s red carpet event I realized that I’d misplaced our tickets. My client had no problem getting in, but I had to double back to the hotel to see if I could locate them. I didn’t. When I got back to the event, the head of security walked me to my seat to verify my identity with the client. This was a great relief, but I dropped the ball.”


Griffin says he appreciated the client’s understanding, and immediately started perfecting his craft.


"I learned how to call ahead wherever we went to meet the director of security, and any appropriate staff,” Griffin says. “Chiefs of police, sheriffs, whatever members of law enforcement I’d connected with, would meet us at airports. Security leaders also met us at venues. No more stopping at lights. No more problems presenting credentials. My name to many people was ‘The Bodyguard,’ and it carried a lot of weight.”


Griffin’s responsibilities quickly expanded beyond those of a “bodyguard,” and he credits his willingness to embrace his failures - as well as his successes - for the life he feels blessed to lead today.


“Learn from your mistakes,” he reminds us, “and never make the same mistake twice.”

Time To Travel

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travel safety tips

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March 8, 2019


Daylight Saving Time begins on March 10th, and the first day of Spring is 10 days later. That means that millions of people across the United States are thinking about taking a trip. They may already have it planned.


If it’s getting to be time to travel for you, here are a few tips that may help you have a safer, more satisfying experience:

Call ahead (or connect online). If you are traveling by plane, see if you can check-in early. Make sure your train or boat timing and travel details are as you planned, or reserved. Find out if there is a way for you to be notified of last-minute schedule changes.


Make sure your vehicle is in great shape. If you’re driving, make sure whatever vehicle you will use is road ready. You don’t want a vehicle maintenance break in the middle of your vacation. AAA has a helpful tip sheet.


Make a room request. If staying in a hotel, motel, or any place that has several rooms and more than one level, request a room closest to the nearest exit. If your room has direct access to the outside, make sure you understand the emergency exit procedures.


Walk the space. When you arrive, make time to walk the hotel, motel, or wherever you are staying. Use the stairs, if any, closest to your room. Check the emergency exit procedures. Confirm that the space meets your expectations, feels safe and comfortable, and is staffed by professionals.


Know the location(s) of the nearest hospital, or urgent care facility.


Refill all important medications before your trip. Confirm that you have the appropriate medications in the appropriate amounts packed as advised.


Make sure you have secure ways to carry your valuables. For example, the larger, open purse a woman may carry while running errands at home, will not be appropriate for a vacation.


Be mindful of how you handle your money. Depending upon where you are going, you may want to be mindful of flashing your cash. If there is an exchange rate, know it, and be prepared with local currency.


Be mindful of how you carry yourself. Enjoy your travel, whether for business or pleasure, but remain aware of your surroundings. Do you need to make that phone call while in a public location, and in that loud a voice? Does this person, or place, feel like the right one to ask for directions? It is possible to trust your gut and use good sense while remaining friendly and non-discriminatory.


When traveling overseas, make sure there are duplicate copies of your passport (one stays home, and one goes with you but is kept apart from the original). Have contact information for the U.S. Embassy in the country you are visiting, including the address, and contact them as appropriate. Research local transportation, traditions, laws and regulations, especially those that may have an impact on your trip. Include any local news and crime statistics, depending upon where you are going, how long you are staying, and your specific plans.


Most people travel safely most of the time. Make sure you, and those you care about, are among them.

Keeping Celebrities Safe

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celebrity safety tips

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March 5, 2019


Who is your favorite celebrity? Now imagine you bump into that person at your workplace. They’re there, right in front of you, without any special announcement or event. Imagine you’ve got to get right back to work, but you pause. Anyone would.


“Staying focused while keeping celebrities safe is hard,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It’s not like protecting most politicians or a property. Things can change very quickly, and you can find yourself surrounded by thousands of people wanting to get close to your client. Even when you get used to being around any type of high-profile client, you may find yourself close to someone who makes you pause.”


Griffin knows. He spent a decade providing security for celebrities.


“One cold, winter night while working a photo shoot for a national recording artist I received word that we would be attending a birthday party for another well-known artist, Usher,” Griffin says. “I didn’t have much time to prepare, so I quickly bought a black suit to accompany my artist to the event.


“As soon as we walked in I knew I would need to use a different type of security training. Our typical six or eight bodyguards with a motorcade in tow? Gone. It was just me. So there I was, literally shoulder-to-shoulder with a crowd of A-list celebrities. I had to stay close but not overbearing, because my client had a stalker. In the corner of my eye I saw Denzel Washington speaking with an NBA legend, then Mariah Carey dressed in a white fur coat greeted my client with a hug. The CEO of Bad Boy Records walked by with another big star, and I found myself in awe for a split second.


“When my client left the party, we pushed through fans and paparazzi yelling my client’s name.”


Staying focused and professional comes with time and experience. The best way to shorten the amount of time it takes is to prepare, as Griffin mentions in an earlier post. Even if you are doing security at a retail outlet right now, give it your best. You are building the professionalism that will serve you wherever your security career, or any career, takes you.


Better Safe Than Sorry

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home safety tips

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March 1, 2019


More than three million people in the United States age 12 or older reported being a victim of a violent crime in the past six months, according to the most recent statistics in the National Crime Victimization Survey. The Alliance for Safety and Justice reported that one in four people have been a crime victim in the past 10 years, and most of them want more resources poured into preventing crime and truly rehabilitating those who commit crimes rather than increased investments in prisons and jails.


Low-income people, especially non-whites, are more likely to be victims of crime, but the wealthy and well-known are also targeted.

Believe it or not, some basic behaviors can help limit your likelihood of becoming a crime victim, even if it’s already happened.


DO try these at home:

Make sure every door and window is locked when you leave home. When you go to school or work, a lot of criminals do. Most burglaries that occur when the victim isn’t home take place during the day.


Lock your doors and windows when you are at home, too. Day or night, a lot of criminals get in by simply taking advantage of an unlocked door or window.


Don’t leave spare keys in places that others can easily find. It’s the next best thing to leaving a door or window unlocked.


If you have an alarm system, use it. The best system is only as good as your commitment to using it, along with your good sense (see above).


If you plan to have a roommate, set ground rules ahead of time. Have a state background check done. Be careful when you let anyone in your home, especially those you don’t know.


Have insurance. Make sure your property and valuables are covered under homeowners, renters and/or hazard insurance. If you have renters, require them to have insurance.


Never take the same route when driving home from work, school, or any other regularly scheduled activity. This helps you have multiple routes to get home, and makes it much harder for others to know your schedule.


Your best efforts may still not be enough to keep you, your loved ones, and your valuables safe. If you become a crime victim, reach out for support from family and friends, law enforcement and courts services, as well as the faith community and other local organizations such as social service agencies.


So You Want To Be A Security Professional

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tips for security professionals

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February 26, 2019


There aren’t enough words to describe how we feel about the incredible men and women who are willing to put their lives on the line to defend others. Respect, admiration, esteem, appreciation, honor. These words only come close to describing our regard for anyone who puts on a military, police or security uniform.


But security work is NOT for everyone. Just like anything else, the best professionals make it look easier than it is. If you really believe you have what it takes to put on one of those uniforms, or provide a security-related function such as private investigation, we want you to start by developing three ways to operate that can secure your own safety as well as the safety of those you have chosen to protect: study, communicate, practice.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin tells a story about an experience early in his career when all of these principles came together. He served as head of security for a well-known public figure, who had decided to lead a 30-mile march in the Atlanta, Georgia area.


“The preparation consisted of months studying the area and meetings with state and local police, including SWAT teams, in each county and the city,” Griffin says. “We also coordinated with hospitals and ambulance services that followed the motorcade, plus security personnel with other dignitaries who would also be participating. We had several layers of protection, including police officers assigned to closely protect my client 24 hours a day for a week.


“Despite all our preparations, a man with a bag in his hand rushes through the crowd during the march,” Griffin remembers. “He broke through three levels of security only to be stopped by me, who was closest to the client. We searched him, and found out that it was only a bottle of liquor in the bag. He was just excited to meet my client.


“We had practiced security scenarios, so we were prepared. That man could just as easily have been an attacker. A person who is willing to trade their life for whatever reason is the most dangerous person in the room. You can never be over prepared when providing security. Make time for practice, practice and more practice. It pays off when you least expect it,” Griffin says.


Study security principles, policies and regulations. Also notice news reports of physical security breaches, and where security practices are being challenged. Ask yourself a variety of questions about how you would handle the situation. Imagine the scenario from different vantage points, such as imagining you are the officer involved, a possible victim, or the facility/venue where the incident takes place.


Communicate with appropriate parties. Wherever you are and whatever you do, there are opportunities to practice effective communication. It can be in your personal relationship, with family members and friends, or on your job. Can you be more clear, make your point using as few words as possible, and use language the person you’re communicating with can easily understand? Can you make the person you’re speaking to hears your care as much as any command? Have you ever written a brief report of a situation or event? If you’re not sure about any of these, practice.


Speaking of practice, do it. A lot. It’s not enough to make sure you’re in physical shape, even though that is very important. You may have to stand or walk for extended periods of time, carry several and/or heavy items while moving quickly, or carry, lift and lay something/someone down. Can you do it? You may also have to react quickly under stress. Do you know how you handle surprising and/or stressful situations? Practice excellent security procedures regularly, so they will be second nature when the stressful situation or emergency takes place. And it will, but you’ll never know when. As the Boy Scott motto says, “Be prepared.”


We wish you the best as you build your security career. If you need additional support, contact us to see if any of our consulting services or workshops are right for you.


Your Partner's Cheating Heart

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private investigators for family and business cases

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February 22, 2019


As the old Hank Williams song says, the cheating heart will make you weep. Possibly both of you. However, many people save the weeping for when they are sure their partner is, in fact, cheating.


Today’s lovers have extra tech tools that help them search for evidence that confirms their suspicions. There are too many ways for an unfaithful partner to get around old-fashioned things like digging through pockets, and checking credit card statements. Plus, there are several lists of “signs” of cheating.


Many even hire firms like ours to get a private investigator on the case, a situation that we handle efficiently, professionally and with emotional care.


In our experience, people are most likely to hire us when there are children involved, a significant property settlement if the marriage/relationship dissolves, potential for violence, or some combination of all of these factors.


If you suspect your spouse/partner is cheating, we’d like you to keep two things in mind:

First, put as much energy into exploring your feelings about the situation as the situation itself. Whether you’re right or wrong, it will help to get some support from a professional. Look for resources that are easy for you to access based on considerations like location, cost and specific concern (such as domestic violence, gender identity, culture). Could your partner really be working late on a special project, and a past betrayal - even among your parents, other family members, or friends - is coloring the way you view the schedule change? Have you cheated in the past for reasons that were not even clear to you, and are now concerned about payback? Relationships, and betrayal within relationships, can be incredibly complicated. A neutral professional can help you sort things out.


Second, if you feel that you must confirm your suspicions, do it in a way that will best serve you going forward. Don’t let your pain, anger, or fear prompt you to do something that could limit some of your important options in the future, and/or put you at risk. Any children you may have, or other family members, could also be at risk. Risk is not only physical. There are often financial and emotional consequences to consider as well.


Something else to consider: If there is an affair, there is life after an affair. Many couples find ways to stay together and strengthen their commitment. Others go their separate ways, and find fulfilling lives strengthened by the devastating experience. Make sure you have the information and emotional support you need to make wise decisions about how to handle your specific situation.


Judgement Day? Not On His Watch

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executive protection

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February 19, 2019


Decades ago, Leumas Security Services founder Samuel Griffin was on his third day leading security for a presidential candidate. He’d already criss-crossed the nation on jets, had to scrutinize people he’d idolized, and could comfortably understand security information on an earpiece while a crowd of thousands roared.


Then one cold, winter night in Iowa, the State Police called just as he was settling into his hotel room. A hate group had stated this was Judgement Day for his client. Griffin told his client, who reminded Griffin that his life was in Griffin’s hands.


“I went to my knees and prayed,” Griffin remembered. “When I got up, my common sense and what I’d already learned about security kicked in. I asked for a meeting with the state and local police departments. I asked them to extend the security perimeter, and not allow anyone within the close protection circle. We also skipped the rope line where politicians typically greet their supporters.

“It only cost me a migraine, the first of many after a tense evening of executive protection work, but the hate group did not get the opportunity to judge my client,” Griffin said. “Not on my watch.”


Griffin also said he became clear that night about the power of his faith, and the fact that there is greatness in everyone. With that clarity he built a security company that he has owned with his wife Imani Harris-Griffin for more than 20 years, and continues to look for ways to expand. He also enjoys sharing what he's learned about security and life.


“You’ve got to live your dreams,” he said. “It’s not going to be easy, and most people don’t finish the race toward their dreams, but it can be done.”


How? Using principles he’s built into Leumas Security Services:

*Honesty. Tell the truth to yourself, and to your clients. This basic principle is rooted in Griffin’s faith, but he believes any person of good character will always find a way to be honest.

*Hard work. Griffin worked with migraines, tooth aches, back aches, and his clients and colleagues almost never knew. However, hard work is not always physically painful. It can mean putting in the time to study when you would rather be watching the game, or whatever is necessary for you to successfully live your dreams.

*Customer Service. Always do your best to give your customer your best. This seems obvious, but it always needs to be repeated. There are times when giving the customer/client the best service may even mean not working with them at all, sharing information that is uncomfortable for both of you, or correcting an error you were not directly responsible for.


“Don’t just support other people’s dreams,”Griffin said. “Live your dreams. More often than you think, the impossible is possible.”


Being a "Booster" for Those Who Boost Kids

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supporting the community, Captain George's

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January 28, 2019


Leumas Security Services, LLC, is proud to be a new Lafayette High School (Williamsburg, VA) Athletic Booster. While serving as primary sponsor of today’s boys basketball game, the company will make it possible for some lucky winner to leave with a free gift card!


Providing this type of support for the “Home of the Rams” has special meaning for Leumas Security Services, LLC, founder Samuel Griffin, III.


“My first two years at Lafayette High School were a blur,” he shared. “I was mentally recovering from my parents’ divorce. I spent most of my time in the library, too embarrassed to take the free/reduced lunch I qualified for. Back then you had to give the special card to the lunch lady, so other kids would know.


“To help out, I got a job as a busboy at Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant. Working 32-40 hours a week while in school, I was eventually able to help my mom and buy whatever lunch I wanted.”


During Griffin’s Junior Year at Lafayette, things got even better. “I met Coach Fields, who became my wrestling coach. He helped me advance to states my first year of wrestling. During my senior year I lettered, was on the Varsity Wrestling Team and found my voice.


“Life at home was no longer a struggle financially, but my brother started having trouble accepting our parents’ divorce and turned to life in the streets. I needed a way to keep the pain of my past from determining my future. I started writing the United States Secret Service, and found out that I had to go to college to even be considered as an agent.


“I quit wrestling my senior year at Lafayette High School, and started focusing on establishing a career. I was soon promoted to assistant manager at Captain George’s under the Leadership Of General Manger Greg Beehneer.


“I did go to college, where I was able to bring together my physical skills with my interest in public safety. I’ve been doing some type of security work for almost 30 years and today, with my wife, we run our own security company.”


Leumas Security Services, LLC, clients have included the Captain George’s where Griffin was once a busboy. Now that his company is an LHS Booster, Griffin wants to help coaches do for today’s students what Coach Fields did for him.


“You never know what kid might be financially broken, like I was, but mentally and spiritually rich. Those kids need coaches and other adults who can really see them, and those adults need all the support they can get from the rest of us.”


Winter Driving Check Up

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winter driving tips

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January 11, 2019


We hope you get your regular medical check-ups. When was the last time you gave your driving skills a check-up?


Sharp driving skills are especially important when weather conditions can make driving dangerous, like in the winter. Driving safety includes your ability to stay attentive enough to follow an old driving rule: Watch out for the other guy or gal. This is especially easy to do these days, when technology can help. Many cars offer upgrades that help you safely backup, warn you to buckle your seatbelt and stop you if something is too close. And of course you can go online for driving lessons, like these quick winter driving tips offered by Consumer Reports.


But no amount of technology can replace your good sense.


Make sure you are safely warming up your car when it's cold outside. For example, your car is not running in a closed garage, and you do not leave it unlocked and running where someone can simply jump in and drive away.


Keep your eyes on the road. There are entire campaigns dedicated this, such as Don't Text & Drive. Be mindful of how eating can take your attention away from your destination, as can other people in the vehicle.


The basic rules for staying safe and secure almost anywhere are the same when you are in a car: plan ahead, have the right equipment and make sure it is in good operating order, and stay alert.


Remembering the "Queen of Soul"

Posted on August 16, 2018 at 4:37 PM


Today the world lost an incredible artist long known as the "Queen of Soul," Aretha Franklin.


  The security business often leads to work with, for and around famous people. That was the case with Leumas Security Services founder Samuel Griffin. His work led him into Ms. Franklin's space on more than one occasion, so today brought up bittersweet memories.


"The last memory I have," Mr. Griffin said, "was of [Aretha Franklin] hugging me and telling me to have a safe flight."


Mr. Griffin went on to say that it was astonishing how such a big star with the breathtaking talent could be "such a little lady ... and loving towards me." Especially when she did not have to be.


May the Queen rest in peace. May the rest of us continue to celebrate her life, and follow her example as Mr. Griffin experienced her: loving towards others when we don't have to be.


Heartbreak-Free Holidays

Posted on December 1, 2017 at 3:25 PM


“The most wonderful time of the year” can quickly turn tragic. Why? Because it’s so easy for many of us to get caught up in the excitement of holiday decorating, cooking, traveling and gift giving, that we forget our safety basics.


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Safety basics this holiday season include:

If people you don’t know start fighting in a store, mall, or club, get as far away from them as you can. Remember: It may be tempting to record them with your cell phone, but even that could put you in danger and the police may want to confiscate your phone to gather evidence.


While shopping, carry your purse close to your body – securely closed, until you need to reach into it – or your wallet inside your coat or front pants pocket.


Be aware of your surroundings. That includes checking inside and around your car before getting in. Have your key and any personal safety device handy.


Don’t buy more than you can carry, and don’t hold your credit card out. Wait until the cashier asks for it.


Don’t leave your car running, with the keys in the ignition, and unlocked – not even for a minute outside your home.


Don’t leave valuables in plain sight in your car.


Practice safe driving. There are many resources to find specific driving tips, and make sure you also keep seasonal driving safety in mind.


Make sure indoor and outdoor decorations are safely displayed, and maintained.


Don’t multi-task your way to a house fire. Set timers and stay focused while cooking.


Practice self-care, too. Manage stress and wash your hands. Who wants to get sick over the holidays? The CDC’s “12 Ways to Health Song” can help you remember some great health/safety basics.


If you can manage to keep safety in mind over the holidays, you are well on your way to doing it through the New Year.


Have a safe, happy and healthy holiday season!

I Love the Night Life

Posted on November 30, 2017 at 9:05 PM


It’s that time of year again: When it gets dark earlier. There are also a lot of activities - parties, sporting events, shopping - that may begin in daylight, and end after dark even though it may not be that late.

nighttime safety tips

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This is a great time for a reminder about some basic rules of the road:

Start putting your bright, reflective clothes on earlier in the day. Make sure your children do, too. Afterschool activities that keep young people out until 5:00 p.m. or later weren’t that much of a problem a couple of months ago. They are now. See "Think!": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0c75VKvcsY" target="_blank"


Park and walk in well-lighted areas.

Let people know where you are going, and when you think you will arrive or return.


Walk against traffic, especially if there is no sidewalk or path. This means that you should be facing traffic, unless there is only one sidewalk and it is on the other side of the street. Using the sidewalk or path should always be your first choice.


Make sure your plans include travel time. Don’t ignore the rules of the road, like the speed limit, because you are running late. Slow down. You could get hurt, or hurt someone else. As it gets darker, it may be harder to see. If there is an emergency, you can maintain better control of your vehicle if you are driving more slowly. This includes driving below the speed limit when it is raining or snowing. See "Just Slow Down": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5EyOnccJLg


As you plan to enjoy the many activities coming up this winter, consider ways to make sure everyone gets there, and back home, safely.

Thanksgiving Tripping

Posted on November 21, 2017 at 4:40 PM


AAA expects more than 50 million people to hit the road to celebrate Thanksgiving this year, going 50 miles or more to
spend time with loved ones.

Thanksgiving

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89% of all travelers will be on the road. Are you one of them? If so, don’t be afraid to get back to basics when you, or someone you care about, is behind the wheel:

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  • Don’t let your gas tank get too low, and make sure your car is road ready. For example, make sure you’re not overdue for an oil change, your tires are properly inflated, and your windshield wipers work well.
  • Pack high protein snacks and water.
  • Have emergency supplies, like a working flashlight and First Aid kit.
  • Pay attention to the weather forecast for your destination.
  • Be well rested and alert.
  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drive impaired.
  • See the full Red Cross list, including tips for travel with pets, here.

Happy Thanksgiving!

When Your Fingers Do The Shopping

Posted on November 15, 2017 at 7:05 PM

As the days are cooling down in most of the U.S., the shopping season is really heating up. Too bad it’s heating up for thieves as well as honest shoppers. That may be especially true online.

online shopping safety

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Online shopping is expected to grow this year, and that means the need to stay safe online does, too. The National Crime Prevention Council suggests that you:


*Update your computer’s security software.

*Keep your password secure.

*Shop on secure websites.

*Shop with companies you know and trust.


Other online security https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/saltzman/2017/10/28/6-tips-safe-online-shopping/802965001/" target="_blank">experts also suggest making sure sellers on sites like eBay are reputable, and steer clear of public “Hot Spots.”

These days whether you’re buying online or in a bricks and mortar store, smart shoppers still do their homework. Instead of simply considering what to buy, think about where and how to buy it, too.

Gun Safety and Kids

Posted on November 13, 2017 at 7:50 PM

If you are going to buy a weapon, your first step should be into a classroom. Learn how to handle a weapon, and what state laws govern legal ownership.

If you plan to keep the weapon in a home where there are children, take extra precautions. KidsHealth.org suggests talking to your children about gun safety, and the difference between real guns and play.

gun safety, kids gun safety

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They also suggest special care, like:

*Take the ammunition out of the gun.

*Lock the gun and keep it out of the reach of kids.

*Lock the ammunition and store it apart from the gun.

*Lock up gun-cleaning supplies, which are often poisonous.

Talking to your children about ways to stay safe, and carefully listening to their concerns, can make a world of difference.

For more information, click here.

It's That Time Of Year Again

Posted on November 3, 2017 at 4:55 PM 

personal safety

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Most people felt safe while going to concerts, clubs, stores or bike riding. For many people, tragically, that has changed in recent months. Large, news-making events where people have been attacked have a lot of us filled with fear when we even think about being in crowded areas as we head into the holiday season, when it seems like every place is crowded.


But this is also the season when see a rise in the number of everyday crimes. The person who violently attacks another, maybe even someone they supposedly love. The thief who takes advantage of our little lapses in awareness. But here is the bottom line: Even if you locked yourself inside your home all day, every day, you still would not be able to guarantee that you will be 100% safe. Yet you can be safer.


Here are 5 ways to fight fear - and crime - that help keep you, and those you care about, safe:


1. Keep using many of the basics you learned as a child. Examples: Look both ways before you cross the street, buckle your seatbelt, know where the exits are. You may be old enough to talk to strangers, but you're never too old to take time to properly assess them.


2. Lock up before you leave. That means your home, in most communities, as well as your vehicle. And make sure areas where you must enter, exit, walk/bike and park are as well lighted as possible.


3. Don't leave valuables visible in your vehicle, or outside of your residence.


4. Keep your purse and wallet secure. If you are carrying your wallet/money and keys in pockets, make sure the pockets are deep and not easy to reach into. If you carry a purse, make sure it is securely closed and safely carried.


5. Consider a personal emergency alarm, and/or a light, but remember that they do not take the place of good judgement.


Here's wishing you a season of safety that lasts for years to come.

Employees Ripping You Off?

Posted on November 30, 2014 at 6:15 PM

employee theft, customer theft

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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

tour group safety

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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

What a Trip!

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 10:10 PM


You don’t have to be a serious “leaf peeper” to be thinking about a fall foliage tour. Fall is a great time to take a wide variety of trips with a group, including a tour that can help students get their heads back into the books.


Before your tour bus pulls off, even if it's a school bus, make sure safety is also on board. We trust that you are thinking about safety, but want to make sure you consider some additional points.


*Have your detailed itinerary include the name and mobile number (when applicable) of every person on the trip, and have more than one copy. Handle this information responsibly.


*If a member of the tour group doesn’t have a mobile number, make sure they are partnered with someone who does.

*Have a security person go over the itinerary with you. Security professionals can help you better understand and navigate the tour area/location. When possible, have that security person join you. Depending upon the trip and size of the group, security only costs a few additional dollars per person. The peace of mind is priceless.


*Every moment doesn’t have to be accounted for, but there should be structure. Plan times when everyone should meet at specific locations. No excuses!


*Chaperones must maintain the agreed-upon tour structure. If tour organizers feel that a chaperone is not going to be able to do this, that person should be given another duty. Non-compliance is not acceptable.


*Tour organizers should have a plan in place for participants who do not comply with the tour guidelines.


*Tour organizers should have a plan in place for medical and other emergencies.


You want everyone to say “What a trip!” when they get home, and mean it in the best way possible.


What Clients Say-Kena Conference Center

Posted on August 29, 2014 at 7:30 PM

We are proud to serve the Kena Conference Center in Northern Virginia, and thank Dr. Alex Cullison for his support.

Here is the letter we received from him today:


Kena Conference Center has been employing the security officers of Leumas Security Services for a year now.


We have found the officers to be well-trained, professional and punctual. The company provides excellent service at a competitive rate.


 They are service orientated and communicate meaningfully and productively with their clients.


We recommend Leumas for all the types of services they perform in the security industry.


-Dr. Alex Cullison, Rental Agent


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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

"Do's" To Help You Do For Others

Posted on August 27, 2014 at 11:05 PM


There has been a lot of attention on law enforcement in recent weeks, and rightfully so. Law enforcement and private security professionals have the high calling of keeping people safe. Lives are always, literally, in our hands.


But they are human hands. They also require care. We encourage security professionals to take care of themselves. It is impossible to effectively care for anyone else if your needs are consistently unmet. That’s true in and out of uniform. 


self-care tips for security pros

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We encourage you to do what’s right, for yourself and those you are supposed to “serve and protect.” Don’t wait on official requirements.

Do:

*Make sure you feel appropriately trained. If you feel as if you need more or additional training, especially regarding talking in ways that cool tense situations, ask for it. We get the pride thing, but that’s what comes before the fall.


*Get to know those you serve. If you live outside of the community, try to spend some time there not being Mr. or Ms. Law-and-Order. Or, while working, be open to learning about them as people first, not crime stats waiting to happen.


*If there are obvious problems with diversity and/or lack of community representation, address them. Support leadership in efforts to fix them.


*Watch your stress level. It’s a stressful profession. It’s easy to get “help” from drugs, alcohol, risky sex, food, crazy spending, whatever. You might not even know that the stress is keeping this stuff going in your life. If you can’t stop doing anything on this list for a couple of days, you may have a problem. Get help. Talk to someone, and not one of the people you do that stuff with.


*Make sure there is random drug testing, and make sure that you always pass.


*Check yourself. Are you in this business because you truly want to serve the community, and keep people safe, or does the uniform make you feel big after a lifetime of feeling small? What better way to cover a self-esteem problem than to become the bully, and licensed for it? If you don’t want to protect others from the bullies of the world, maybe you need to take a break. Maybe permanently.


*Make sure you are well rested. If you have a lot of trouble sleeping, get professional help.


*Spend time with people who love you.


*Consider spiritual support. If you are a member of a religious or spiritual community, find out if there are ways you can get additional support there. Your “spirit” can also be fed through practices such as Tai Chi, yoga or meditation.


*Make time for fun. If you don’t have a safe, sane hobby, experiment with some activities. Pull out that old musical instrument, old toolbox or old car and live it up.


Yes, live. We want law enforcement and security professionals to live as much as we want people who encounter them to live. We believe that security and law enforcement personnel can, and should, be part of the solution to problems in every community. We understand that there will be times when the worst will happen, but we “keep hope alive” that they will become rare.

Thanksgiving Tripping

Reach Out Today

For more information about our services, please contact us. We are happy to answer your questions

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Leumas Security Services LLC