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Leumas Security Services LLC in Newport News, Virginia is dedicated to the safety of our clients. Read our blog to find out the many ways you can protect yourself, and to learn more about us.

Vehicles and VIPs

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Safe vehicles can mean safe VIPs

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May 21, 2019


If you are - or wind up being - a security professional who works with a VIP, especially a celebrity at the height of their career, you may take a lot of trips in a limousine or some other luxury vehicle. These vehicles attract fans and others to the celebrity you are protecting. In many cases, that’s fine.


However, there are times when the celebrity would like to run errands, or relax for an evening, without attracting attention. This may mean using another vehicle, and that vehicle could even be yours.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin has been there.


Griffin was working security for an event in the Richmond, Virginia area several years ago, when one of the celebrity guests needed a break. He and the celebrity’s assistant came up with the idea of an evening at the movies.


“Instead of having the celebrity driven in the stretch limousine, we rode in my personal vehicle,” Griffin says. “We were escorted through the back door of the movie theater, and seated quietly in the back row where we watched the featured film.


“When it was over, we rushed the celebrity out the theater’s rear entrance and into my car,” Griffin remembers, “because crowds would certainly have rushed my client. As exciting as it can be to be seen with a well-known celebrity, security professionals should remain as invisible as possible.”


Griffin says it felt good to be able to keep his celebrity client safe while throwing in the special trip. It turns out that the client felt good, too.


“As a result of having a quiet and restful weekend, the client sent me a gift that I have kept to this day.”


That entire experience could have been much more challenging had Griffin not kept his car in shape, which means more than washed and waxed.


Even if you don’t have one of this year’s safest cars, most cars can be safer if they are well maintained. Don’t skip basic car care, such as regular oil changes, replacing fluids, and rotating your tires.


“Having a plain but reliable secondary vehicle during a visit of a famous person or well-known executive, which could be your personal car, can help keep the attention off your client,” says Griffin. “It is also safer for you and your family to ride in, and helps you get to work on time.”

Stalking Victims

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Safety tips for stalking victims

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May 17, 2019


In our most recent post, we talked about security pros responding to stalkers. However, if you or someone you know is being stalked, you need some safety tools of your own.


Security professionals are encouraged to listen when victims report their concerns about being stalked, and take those concerns seriously. Victims are also encouraged to listen. To themselves.


Research shows that stalking is more common than you may think, and it can take a terrible toll on the victim's life. However, the person being stalked does not have to remain a victim. There are several safety strategies that can help.


There may be the tendency to downplay whatever behavior is making you uncomfortable. Don’t! Tell family, friends and co-workers about the situation. If there are security professionals where you work, near your home, or wherever you regularly participate in a community activity, let them know so they can help you be on the lookout for the stalker.


It may also be wise for you to consult security and mental health professionals, as well as a crisis hotline or victim services agency. All of this lets others know what’s going on. If they know, they can help you sort through your feelings, and they may be able to help you create an appropriate action plan.


A good action plan includes not communicating with the stalker, and keeping any evidence of the stalking (such as voicemails and texts). It is also important to change regular routines such as travel between work or school and home. If you feel it’s necessary, don’t hesitate to contact the police and get a court order telling the stalker to stay away from you.


According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, “most victims were commonly stalked by someone of the opposite sex, an intimate partner, or someone else they knew. Stalking tactics can include unwanted phone calls, voice messages and text messages; being approached; or being watched, followed or tracked by the perpetrator. About 68% of female and 70% of male victims experienced threats of physical harm during their lifetime.”


If you are feeling afraid, anxious, unsafe, and changing how you live your life because of someone else’s behavior towards you - even if that someone was once very close to you - you need help. Reaching out for that help is not weak. It is a strong and smart way to take care of yourself.

Stalking and Security Pros

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Stalking and security pros

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May 14, 2019


In the U.S., one in six women and one 19 men, have been pursued by a stalker in their lifetime. A stalker is someone who harasses another person in an aggressive way that is often threatening, and it is illegal.


Sometimes you’ll hear a joking reference to stalking, or having a stalker, but it is no laughing matter. Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin remembers providing security for a high-profile individual who had a stalker.


“During a commercial flight from Virginia to California my client advised me that my client’s male stalker was on the flight, and dressed as a woman. This person was not only stalking my client, but calling radio stations pretending to actually be my client,” Griffin remembers.


“I immediately contacted the captain of the flight, who alerted local police. The police met us at our layover stop to California. The stalker wasn’t committing any crimes on the plane, so the flight continued. The captain did, however, make sure we were seated as far apart as possible for the duration of the flight.”


If you are providing security for someone who is being stalked, Griffin suggests you keep a current picture of the person giving your client any problems (if possible), and keep your security skills sharp. This includes listening closely when you get a complaint about someone’s behavior, and appropriately following-up. Stalking victims often have good instincts, and are encouraged to respect their feelings when any person or situation seems unsafe.


“Some fans will go through extremes to get close to the person they desire,” says Griffin. “They are the most dangerous fans. We also have to remember that stalking often leads to more serious crimes such as assault, kidnapping, or worse.”


Security professionals could face this situation anywhere, because a person doesn’t have to be a celebrity to have a stalker.


Griffin says, “Celebrity stalker court cases, and even murder, make the news. But there are actually more cases of everyday people around the world who are victimized and traumatized by stalkers. Security professionals must have the appropriate training for these types of circumstances.”

Summer Fun: Swimming and Boating

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Safe swimming and boating

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May 10, 2019


We looked at safe ways to enjoy warm weather activities like camping and summer sports in an earlier post. Warm weather can also mean more opportunities to swim, enjoy a boat ride, or both.


Swimming and boating can be very dangerous if not done safely.


According to the World Health Organization, drowning is the “3rd leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide.” In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that about 10 people die every day from an unintentional drowning. And those do not include boating accidents.


In 2017, the U.S. Coast Guard counted “4,291 accidents that involved 658 deaths, 2,629 injuries and approximately $46 million dollars of damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents.”


The Coast Guard also reported that “where cause of death was known, 76% of fatal boating accident victims drowned. Of those drowning victims with reported life jacket usage, 84.5% were not wearing a life jacket.”


In order to improve the odds of you and your loved ones enjoying swimming and boating, use some basic safety precautions.


Take swimming lessons. Learn how to swim at a local YMCA, or other organization that offers Red Cross and other certified swimming instruction.


Follow water and swimming safety guidelines. Basics such as swimming in designated, areas are helpful, even if you are a seasoned swimmer. Also make sure you drink plenty of water, and protect your skin with sunscreen.


Stay focused. Yes, you’re having fun, but many swimming and boating tragedies could have been avoided if people had been paying closer attention. When operating a boat, or letting kids swim and play a backyard pool as part of a party (or any body of water), there must always be focused supervision.


Follow boating safety guidelines. In addition to staying focused, make sure the right life jackets are available for everyone on board and they’re being used. Driving under the influence is not appropriate for motor vehicle drivers, or boat operators. Check out the Coast Guard’s videos and other important information to help you safely enjoy boating.


Adding safety practices to your swimming or boating trip may take more planning time, but it is time well spent because it could save your life or the life of someone you care about.

Split-Second Decision

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Split-second decisions

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May 7, 2019


A recent post pointing out the possible dangers security professionals face when someone has “nothing to lose” also showed us the importance of making a smart, split-second decision.


Making quick decisions can be hard for anyone. In some situations, like security, these decisions can be the difference between life and death.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin knows these decisions may not always be well received in the heat of the moment, but do your best to make sure they are right.


“One of my clients often visited Atlanta,” he remembers. “During one particular visit, many dignitaries traveled from site-to-site throughout the city with my client. We also had a large entourage of Sheriff’s Department Deputies, and state police.


“One particular stop stands out. After leaving a church, one of the dignitaries rushed to catch up with my client while the officers attempted to get my client quickly and safely into a vehicle. The well-known dignitary was stopped and pushed to the ground in seconds. The individual complained to me about being pushed down, and not helped to get up after being identified,” Griffin says.


“In the security field, you will have to make split-second decisions that could hurt the feelings of people you think are important,” Griffin says. “My client’s life was the top priority of the security team members in that moment. They made the right call, and I didn’t mind handling the misunderstanding with the dignitary.”

Summer Fun: Camping and Sports

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Summer fun includes camping and sports

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May 3, 2019


Most of the U.S. is heading into consistently warmer weather. That gives us more opportunities to enjoy outdoor activities, and possibly get hurt. It makes sense to start thinking about the many ways you and your loved ones can have “hot fun in the summertime” while staying safe.


Let’s start with camping and summer sports.


Camping has its own unique challenges, because in most cases there’s only a thin piece of fabric between you and the great outdoors. Smart camping includes safely packing and preparing your food, making sure you have the right clothing for the weather as well as any activities you may have planned, and avoiding wild animals.


If you’re going to have a campfire, think about more than roasting marshmallows. Safety behaviors include thoughtfully locating, building, and extinguishing your campfire.


Make sure you plan to enjoy activities such as hiking during your camping trip. Many of the same personal safety practices you need for relaxed camping activities also apply to organized summer sports.


Those safety practices include staying hydrated (drinking more water than beverages containing sugar and/or alcohol), wearing sunscreen, and properly utilizing whatever equipment is most appropriate for the activity. If you are using specialized clothing or equipment, make sure you are comfortable with it before you really need to use it.


Carefully planning and preparing for warm weather activities such as camping and summer sports help make it more likely you, or someone you care about, will have a safe summer.

Nothing to Lose

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Watch for people with nothing to lose

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April 30, 2019


“A person who feels they have nothing to lose is a person who can be extremely dangerous,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “If you want to be a smart and effective security professional, you need to be aware of the fact that a person like this can come from anywhere, at any time.”


To repeat, this type of person can be extremely dangerous. No matter what your security role - security guard, personal protection for an executive or celebrity, private investigator - you must prepare yourself to face this type of individual one day.


Griffin recalls facing someone like that one summer early in his executive protection career.


“I received word that I would be escorting my client to a small town hall meeting in Santa Monica, California,” Griffin says. “Suddenly during the event, a man in the back of the room stood up and started yelling. I immediately made contact with my client, to ease any concerns he may have had.


“The man started moving closer to the stage, and his yelling escalated. He broke into a full run toward my client, and I could hear him shouting about having AIDS so he was going to die anyway. By then I was running toward him, snatched him up quickly, and brought him outside of the event. Fearing that another person could go after my client, I escorted the individual to police and promptly resumed my post near the stage while checking to make sure there was no blood or anything on me,” Griffin says.


“He actually said it,” Griffin continues, “He was going to die anyway. In other words, he had nothing to lose, so he was going to do what he felt he had to do to make his point.”


At that time, the mid-1990’s, there was a great deal of research and political activity in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Celebrities were among the hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. announcing they had HIV/AIDS, and according to government statistics it had become the leading cause of death for all Americans ages 25 to 44.


By 1996, the number of new AIDS cases diagnosed in the U.S. declined for the first time since the first official report on the epidemic in 1981, it was no longer the leading cause of death for all Americans 25-44. However, it remained the leading cause of death for African Americans in that age group.


“These days someone can senselessly attack any place at any time, even houses of worship,” Griffin says. “It’s important for security professionals to be on their toes, and help everyone become more security conscious.”

To Drink, or Not to Drink?

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drunk-driving

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April 26, 2019


Before today is over, almost 30 people in the United States will die in an accident that could have been avoided. How? No drunk-driving.


The number of people killed in drunk-driving accidents across the nation has dropped over the years, but according to statistics from 2017, drunk-driving crashes still kill more than 10,000 people every year. Drinking is also linked to a variety of crimes, including 37% of rapes and sexual assaults.


You’ve probably heard all the bad stuff about drunk-driving for most of your life. Hopefully that information has kept you from driving when you’ve had too much to drink, or from letting anyone else drive drunk. If they insist on driving, do your best to change their mind, and don’t ride with them if you can’t. Remember, you can’t always tell when someone is too drunk to drive, so it’s better to play it safe.


There are other reasons to cut down or quit drinking. If you’re dieting, alcohol has hundreds of calories that you don’t need. There’s an old expression, “Don’t drink your calories.” If you have a health condition that is made worse by drinking, don’t drink. You may also be taking medication that should not be mixed with alcohol.


“People don’t always realize that they make small decisions every day that can be the difference between being safe and unsafe,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “Cutting down on the amount of alcohol they drink, or not drinking at all, is a big one.”

Stay Focused

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Stay focused

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April 23, 2019


If you’re a security professional, one of the best things you can do for yourself and those you serve is to admit that there are times when your head is not in the game. Once you admit that, you can find ways to stay focused.


Here are a few common challenges, and ways to handle them:

Fatigue. You may be the type of security person who works a lot of hours, maybe working for more than one company at a time. What to do: Build in times for rest. Lack of sleep can hurt your ability to think clearly and quickly, as well as cause serious health problems.


Routine. You may work the same location for extended hours, and/or over an extended period of time. You get used to the way things always are, and the people who are always there. What to do: Switch things up. When possible, build in times to walk, sit down, break, or check in that are different from your usual way of doing things. Change your route, build in several seconds for stretching or quick exercises, and change your shift.


Overwhelm. You may find yourself in a situation where there are hundreds of people, or even thousands, who you work hard to closely monitor because any one of them could pose a security risk. This can be especially difficult for a new security professional. The idea of being responsible for someone else’s safety, or important property, can also feel like a great deal of responsibility that you’re concerned about your ability to handle. What to do: Talk to other security professionals about your concerns and ways they’ve handled them, study security procedures, and take care of your physical and mental health.


Distractions. Places that become routine are also great places for distractions. It’s easy to start spending too much time talking to staff members or regular customers, or narrow your area of responsibility more than is advisable or safe. You might find yourself developing a personal relationship with someone, and find yourself paying close attention to them. What to do: Make time to refocus. These types of distractions can lead to significant professional and personal problems. You may want to consider some of the changes suggested above, especially speaking to a more seasoned security professional about ways to handle your personal challenges.


Also distracting are situations where there are local or national celebrities. You may be providing security for them, or a place where they show up for any reason. Don’t react to who they are in ways that keep you from being the security professional you are.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin spent several years providing security for famous people. Getting used to being around someone famous is one of many ways working with them can be distracting.


“I worked with an artist who I accompanied on tour for 18 months,” he recalls. “During a break in that tour, I escorted my artist to a weekend event at a Virginia Beach nightclub with Missy Elliott, Lil’ Kim, a host of bodyguards, and local radio personalities.


“One of the radio personalities made it a point to let those that surrounded us know that she was willing to sleep with a particular NBA basketball player. I don’t know what ever happened, but situations like that create an energy that can have a negative effect on the security environment,” says Griffin. “People can start trying to make requests like hers happen in ways that move security personnel out of important positions, her request could have started a fight for some reason, or something unimaginable can happen.”


Griffin says, “Distractions while working will present themselves in various ways. Not staying focused could cause the loss of your job, your entire career, and possibly even your or your client’s life. Stay focused.”

Grief in Oklahoma City

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Oklahoma City National Memorial

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April 19, 2019


“During my first year as the head of security for a high-profile individual, I was notified of a bombing in Oklahoma,” remembers Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “I prepared for a visit to the bombing site without knowing what to really expect, so I braced for the worst.


“When I arrived with my client, we immediately went to visit survivors. I then learned that we would be attending funerals of some of those who were killed in the blast,” Griffin says.


The morning of April 19, 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was bombed by a former Army soldier. The devastating attack claimed 168 lives, including 19 children in the building’s childcare facility. Hundreds of others were injured.


“I’ll never forget the sadness in the room of each funeral,” Griffin says. “I found myself staring at the deceased and becoming overwhelmed with grief. Caring for the most vulnerable people is why I wanted to be a security professional. Seeing people in so much pain, made victims by something so senseless and horrible, it almost overwhelmed me. I worked hard to find a way to leave my emotions in my hotel room. It was very hard.


“These types of trips soon became the norm as tragedy struck throughout the country during my tenure with that client. But it was in Oklahoma City where I learned how to deal with my personal emotions, and stay alert during unusual circumstances.”


Griffin’s suggestions for handling emotionally-charged circumstances include:

Know yourself. Make time to consider situations that are, or could be, especially meaningful for you. For example, if you are a parent, a situation involving a child that reminds you of your own child may be an emotional trigger of some type. Ask yourself how you would handle the situation.


Practice. Find ways to practice your response in situations that are emotional triggers, or out of your regular routine. For example, if you guard a reception area or store that is usually calm, how would you respond if someone entered and suddenly became violent? Or if there is a medical emergency, or a fire? It’s one thing to know a policy or practice in your head. It’s another thing to actually do it when the situation occurs.


Prepare. Get as much information as you can about a situation you may enter before you get there. That’s a lot easier with today’s technology than it was in 1995, and can often be done fairly quickly. Preparation also means making sure you are well rested, fed, and comfortably dressed from the moment you start working.

Richmond Now & Then

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The view from our Richmond, VA office.

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April 16, 2019


“Opening our Richmond, Virginia, office this week brings back a special memory,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“It was at a Richmond hotel in the mid-1990’s where I met the late Winnie Mandela, the activist and second wife of Nelson Mandela. He, of course, was South Africa’s first democratically-elected President and Nobel Prize Winner,” he recalls. “I was hired to coordinate security for Mrs. Mandela and TV Judge Joe Brown. They were featured speakers at one of the National Black Student Leadership Development Conferences started by Dean Carroll Hardy of The College of William & Mary.


“To be in the presence of Winnie Mandela, Judge Brown and the first black governor of Virginia at one event, L. Douglas Wilder, was very special,” Griffin says. “After her speech, I escorted Mrs. Mandela back to her suite where I was asked to enter her room. She motioned me over to where she was sitting. She gave me a kiss and hug, and thanked me for keeping her safe during her visit to Richmond.”


That type of moment helped keep Griffin going. His new company, Griffin’s Executive Protection Agency (which grew into Leumas Security Services), had already expanded to a team of more than 50 people with clients all over the world. He ran the company while traveling with clients for years at a time, taking few days off.


“I had to use every experience I had to manage my extremely hectic schedule,” Griffin says. “I can’t tell anyone else how to live on the road and run a business successfully, but I can say you need confidence, determination, and the ability to put your life experiences to good use.”


If you are in the Richmond, Virginia, area and are ready to put your life experiences to good use while building a security career, contact us.


Prom Safety

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Prom safety

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April 12, 2019


It’s prom season. Now through June, high school juniors and seniors across the US will be planning, getting excited about, and attending the prom.


Make time to check out online and other resources designed to help you, your teen, and/or the teens in your care have a prom night that is safe enough to create a wonderful memory that will last a lifetime.


For Schools: Set the pace. From the planning until everything’s cleaned up, school administrators and teachers build awareness, set policies, and share information in ways that make sure safety is a top priority.


For Parents: Do more than pay. It’s often hard for many teens to believe, but parents have a greater impact on them than they may know. Use it. Let your teen know how much you trust him or her, and discuss as many prom night details as possible. Include the risks. You don’t need to do it all in one conversation.


For Students: Fun and safety DO mix. Driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or even too little sleep can be dangerous. The One Bad decision video quickly makes that important point. You DO NOT have to do anything you don’t want to do, or that doesn’t feel safe. That includes being with certain people, drugs, alcohol, sex, and anything else that doesn’t feel right for you at the time.


It’s only a great prom night if your teen, your teen's date, and your teen's friends all get home safely and feel good about the experience. How else will they have a chance to talk about and remember it?


Staying Well Can Mean Staying Safe

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Staying well can mean staying safe

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April 9, 2019


“Ignoring the body’s warning signs will certainly do you in,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “and if you’re a security professional, that could also be bad for the people and property you’re protecting. Do your best to make sure that doesn’t happen.”


A tough experience early in his personal protection career helped Griffin learn that lesson.


“We were traveling from California to New York, and frequent trips to Chicago then, too,” Griffin remembers. “During one of the Chicago stops I had a temperature of 103, and couldn’t keep down any food. What I could eat quickly came out of the other end. Dehydrated and completely exhausted, I continued my assignment until my body just quit.


“I waited until a backup security team arrived before taking a bathroom break in my client’s office. I passed out while using the bathroom. When I awoke, I arranged to leave the event I was working, and was driven to a place where I could rest and recover,” Griffin says. “Two great things happened: the person who drove me away is now a good friend, and I was scared into learning the importance of taking care of myself.”


Taking care of yourself includes:

Seeing your doctor. Get regular check-ups, and make time to get medical attention as soon as possible after you notice a change in your health status. For example, a fever accompanied by a severe headache or persistent vomiting.


Dressing appropriately. Check the weather forecast for wherever you are working, and make sure you have clothing that will keep you as comfortable as possible. This includes your footwear. “Too often I worked in shoes that did not give my feet enough support, and suits that were heavier than necessary,” Griffin says. “That puts a lot of unnecessary strain on your body.”


Eating a healthy diet. This may seem hard to do because of your schedule, food availability, and budget. However, most times a little research and planning will support your ability to make healthier food choices. Working around nothing but fast-food restaurants? Most of them have healthier options on their menus these days. You just need to choose them. Talk to your doctor about vitamins and other supplements that can also help you stay healthy.


Griffin says it is very important for security personnel to have as much control over a situation as possible. "The healthier you are in body, mind and spirit,” he says, “the better you are at controlling situations in ways that keep people safe, including yourself.”


School Trip Safety

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School trip safety

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April 5, 2019


“All kinds of things happen on school trips that parents never hear about,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “That is why I encourage parents to have their own security for their child, or get together to hire a security officer (or officers). A traveling officer would be dedicated to the group as a whole, and find a security company anywhere you are staying overnight to keep an eye on things while everyone is asleep.”


Griffin says the security is not just to handle threats from outside of the group on the school trip, but inside the group as well. One of his most memorable school trip security experiences involved a group of 13- and 14-year-olds.


“One of the boys had a sheet tied to the balcony railing, and was climbing down to a girl’s room. The girl was pulling him in. As he entered the balcony, we were knocking on the door,” Griffin recalls. “So he was willing to die to get to the girl’s room? He was young. He probably didn't even think.”


Griffin shares these school trip safety measures:

The first step in preparing for your child’s school trip starts with researching the area your child is visiting. Check to see if you have any trusted relatives and/or friends there, or nearby. Get the phone number of the local police/sheriff department where your child is traveling. Check the weather forecast as far into your child’s expected stay as possible.


Make sure the school's safety policy for trips is appropriate, and enforced.


Refill medicines, pack them appropriately, and include your child in this process. Make chaperones aware of the medications as well as any allergies that your child may have. 


Make sure your child’s cell (mobile) phone is charged, and they have their charger. Also send your child on the trip with extra batteries, or a pre-charged battery pack.


Have a state identification card for your child, with a picture, and make sure all information is current.


Make sure your child has cash. More importantly, make sure your child has a prepaid credit card for emergencies, such as getting back home. As a backup plan, you may want to consider a ride-sharing service’s app on your child’s phone with enough money on account for a trip.


Make sure the hotel (motel, bed-and-breakfast, etc.) where your child’s group is staying has good ratings. Check out the tour company, if one is used, and make sure you are comfortable with the adult chaperones.


Have addresses to every location that your child is visiting, in case your child gets lost between sites.


“No one can guarantee that these safety measures, or any others, will keep your child 100% safe,” says Griffin, “but they will make it a lot easier for your child to have a great trip while you have more peace of mind.”


Road Ready

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Be road ready

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April 2, 2019


Travel in, and to, the US is expected to slow a bit over the coming months, but millions of people will still be happy to get, as Willie Nelson sings, “on the road again.”


For professionals handling personal security travel can pose additional challenges, as Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin knows from experience.


“My client was scheduled to go on tour with other artists on a major record label,” Griffin remembers. “As I prepared for us to travel to London, England, I was excited, because this would be my first time going overseas.


“We got to the hotel, and then had to get ready for our first show. So, I skipped lunch and immediately went to the venue. After returning from the show later that evening I realized that I’d really worked up an appetite. I ordered room service: bacon cheeseburger with fries and a Coke. Once room service arrived I asked how much. It cost $75 American dollars! This was a true moment of panic, because I didn’t plan to spend a lot for meals every day. In order to complete the tour without skipping meals I had to eat at an American fast food restaurant to help keep my budget in check.”


Griffin offers a few quick tips for anyone who wants to be road ready:

Manage your money. Budget, shop around for travel deals (and give yourself enough time to do so), and “If you are traveling abroad, make sure you know the value of your currency (American Dollar) compared to the country that you are traveling to,” he says. And make sure you have a safe and comfortable way to carry your money, credit/debit cards, and ID.


Pack right, not just light. Research ways to help you pack everything you feel you’ll need for your trip.


Be smart about how you’re getting there. Trips are not just about the destination. The way you get there is part of the experience. Take a few minutes to research ways to safely and more easily navigate your plane, train, or automobile travel, even if you have done it several times before. Things change. Be prepared.


“I love to travel, and encourage other people to do it,” Griffin says. “When you put in a little time to plan a safe experience for everyone, you’re much more likely to have a great memory that will last a lifetime.”


Show Time!

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it's show time!

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March 29, 2019


Some of this year’s biggest concert tours are just getting started. Thousands of people will be enjoying these shows. You might be one of them. No matter how large or small a public event you plan to attend, add a bit of safety to your showtime outfit.


“Most people can’t afford to hire personal security to take care of them when they attend a public event,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin, “but there are other things they can do to help them enjoy themselves and get home safely.”


Griffin suggests you:

Know the exits. Where are the exits, and how far are they from where you are? Are there other places in the venue that could work as an exit in case of emergency, such as a restroom or kitchen window, or a loading dock?


Get a backstage or VIP pass. If available and you can afford them, these types of passes/tickets often provide safer environments with fewer people crowded together. They cost a little more, but they can be worth it.


Move away from the middle. Can’t afford a special pass? You can still avoid the middle of a crowd at a large concert venue or club. Hang out near the outer edge of the crowd. Most people get hurt during concerts when others start pushing and rushing the stage, or a fight breaks out.


Park safely. When possible, park as close as you can to the concert entrance, especially if it is different from the entrance to the venue and makes it possible for you to leave the area as quickly as possible. It’s hard, but you might also consider leaving the show a little early.


Dress for safety. We know you want to look your best, and there are lots of people with great fashion suggestions, but make sure that whatever you wear is comfortable. “If you have to run for your dear life,” Griffin says, “you won’t want your clothes or shoes to hold you back.”


Remember there’s strength in numbers. Don’t go by yourself to large, public events like concerts. Let others know where you’re going to be. Have a pre-determined meeting place in case any member of your group gets separated, and make sure every group member has every other member’s cell (mobile) phone number. Check in from time to time with family and friends during your outings, especially if you are scheduled to be away overnight.


Have A Backup Plan

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have a backup plan

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March 26, 2019


No matter who you are, or how well you plan, there will come a time when something will go wrong. It is definitely true: expect the unexpected. It can be torn clothing before a major event, a house fire, a medical emergency, or a natural disaster. It will come. So do your best when you plan, which includes having a backup plan.


“I was with a recording artist who was working on an album, when the artist agreed to take a break to honor a short-notice request to do a show in another city,” remembers Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin.


“I was uncomfortable from the moment we arrived at the place where my client was supposed to perform. The promoter’s behavior, team and handling of my client’s fee were all inappropriate. At best. I decided that immediately after the performance, my artist would be moved to a different hotel from the one the promoter arranged. I was able to make that happen by calling someone I worked with in a nearby city. We quickly had a hotel, ground transportation and meal service I could trust. The artist was able to do the show and get back to the recording session ready to work, and I had peace of mind,” says Griffin.


“Always have a backup plan when you’re working,” Griffin warns everyone, especially security professionals, “because life never goes as planned.”


Griffin suggests you:

Plan. The better you plan from the beginning, and include your employer or client in that process, the less likely you are to need a backup plan. Plus, when the backup plan has to kick in, you don’t have to worry about basics because they are already covered. “I knew someone near where my client was going to perform, and had the right, updated phone number ready” Griffin says. “I didn’t have to look for it at the last minute.”


Trust your instincts. If your experience, training and good sense say a situation may not be right, believe them. Be sure to check yourself regularly for biases and fears. “Anyone can have them,” Griffin says, “but professionals know how to check in with themselves and keep training so biases and fears don’t hurt their ability to be trusted and effective.”


Act appropriately. When your backup plan is needed, remain calm and act quickly. “Practice emergency support and escape plans under various conditions,” says Griffin. Those include fires, and active shooter or physically violent person or persons. Security personnel could also practice ways to approach someone who appears to behave suspiciously. That person could be anything from a security threat to someone suffering with a health problem. Too many of these types of incidents can go wrong and make the news.*


“Not having a plan or a backup plan could get you and those around you robbed, hurt, or even killed,” warns Griffin. “Always plan ahead, and have an exit strategy.”


*We share reports of situations security professionals face/faced for informational purposes only. We do not know any of the people involved, and have no recommendations or opinions on these specific situations.


Speaking Up About Sexual Assault

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speak up about sexual assault

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March 22, 2019


Earlier this month the video “Don’t Silence Me” was released. The women responsible for the video want to encourage people who have been victims of sexual assault to speak up.


According to statistics on a U.S. Department of Justice website, 16% of all rapes were reported (12% among college women, with some statistics reporting an overall reporting rate as high as 27%), males tend not to report their victimization, and many factors contribute to why someone - especially a child - may not say anything about their sexual assault or abuse.


The same USDOJ website also reports that 35.8% of sexual assaults occur when the victim is between the ages of 12 and 17. When children do tell what happened to them it is usually to a friend or a sibling. If they tell an adult family member it is usually the mother (depending upon the child’s expected response from her), and if it is a professional it’s most likely a teacher.


What can make speaking up even harder are statistics showing that in 8 out of 10 rape cases, the victim knew the perpetrator.


It may make a difference to the laws of your state whether someone is a sexual predator or a sexual offender. Either way there is a victim, and we must help that victim feel safe enough to tell us what happened and possibly report the crime.


We can:

Get educated. Learn basic safety practices and use them. Learn about the safety issues your child may be facing, get information about ways to handle them, and share what you learn with your child(ren). If your child(ren) is active in sports, church, or the community, make sure there are background checks.


Have conversations. When issues of sexuality, sexual safety and violence prevention come up, take the opportunity to discuss it in a way that’s appropriate for the age and temperament of everyone involved. This also means that no matter how much you know or have experienced, create space to listen to what everyone has to say. Remember the USDOJ report about children reporting sexual assault. They told mom based on the way they thought mom would respond. How mom (or other caring adult) responds during these conversations may make a difference should the need arise.


Consider offenders. A Scientific American article reports statistics showing that 96% of women who report rape or sexual assault were abused by men, but women are also perpetrators. So when you’re sharing information with anyone about ways to stay safe, include tips about not victimizing others.


There are a lot of online resources designed to support sexual assault victims, offenders, and those who care for them. Reach out. Speak up.

Take Care Of Yourself To Take Care Of Your Client

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tips for security professionals

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March 19, 2019


Do you want to be a security professional? Then it is very important for you to take care of yourself in order to take care of your client. Your client can be a retail store where you are serving as an unarmed guard, or a busy celebrity who needs you to provide personal protection. It doesn’t matter. If you are not at your best, you cannot keep doing your best.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin says that if you are serious about a security career, you have to be serious about self care.


“With one client I routinely had 12- to 15-hour days that sometimes ended with migraines,” Griffin says. “Every now and then I would get a break while working, like the time my client visited Los Angeles Lakers great Magic Johnson and his wife Cookie at their home. Our security team was escorted downstairs by a member of the Johnsons’ household staff for an opportunity to recharge a bit. The Johnsons invited us back later that evening for a party that included some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, at that time.


“But later in my career, working with a national recording artist, my ability to work long hours was again put to the test,” Griffin says. “I’d been there when a song or two was recorded, but once I was there for work on a full album. I had to be alert from noon to five or six in the morning every day for several weeks, especially since I had to meet everyone who wanted to enter the studio, and get verbal consent for them to do so. It was tough, but I was tougher.”


To Griffin, being “tough” is about much more than physical strength. Many security professionals make time to work out (if they don’t, they should), but they often forget that recovery time is just as important.


Sleep. Research shows that not getting enough sleep can be hazardous to your health. In fact, there are reports that “being awake for 18 hours straight makes you drive like you have a blood alcohol level of .05 (for reference, .08 is considered drunk),” and sleep deprivation “adversely affects cognitive function such as Reaction Time.” You don’t want to be the security person who falls asleep at the wheel causing a deadly crash, or who is too slow to react to a security crisis.


Manage your work hours, when possible. Working 12 hours a day for seven straight days, or longer, can create an uncontrollable inability to stay awake. Taking pills to stay alert can become addictive, and possibly lead to a dependency on prescription (or other) drugs.


Eat. The body needs fuel for top performance while awake or asleep. The best fuel does not come from energy drinks, coffee, drugs, and alcohol. In fact, those may cause other health challenges, or take away from other healthy habits like your fitness regimen.


Remember that “Burn Out” is real. Every hour of every day there are security professionals on duty somewhere. Good ones are always needed, mostly because the nature of the work is very challenging and getting more challenging every day. Taking care of yourself will help you fight “burn out,” which can send you hopping from one job to another. That may not be satisfying for you, and can be a turn-off to a possible employer in the future.


It is possible to work while sleep deprived, on drugs and various drinks, but not for long. Eventually they will take their toll. Commit to a lifestyle that shows that your life is just as important to you as the lives of those you work hard to protect.


“I’ve been rewarded after long periods of hard work for clients, and blessed to be in situations where I met wonderful people like the woman who is now my wife and business partner, Imani Harris-Griffin,” says Samuel Griffin, “but there were times when it was incredibly hard. I hope that by sharing some of my stories I can make this very important work easier for someone else.”

Safety Standards For Adolescents

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Safety standards for adolescents

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March 15, 2019


You know children need guidance and support long after they leave toddler-sized clothing, but as they get older they become more sure of their ability to navigate life’s ups and downs without adults. Meanwhile, some parents become less sure about how to balance their growing child’s need for independence with genuine concerns for the child’s safety.


The FBI and the United Nations are tracking those who commit violent crimes against children, and are working to find ways to combat this behavior. But recent news reports about beloved musical artists and clergy allegedly abusing children, not to mention other possible child predators, have many parents feeling as if their worst nightmares have (or may) become reality.


There are ways to help the adolescent(s) in your life, defined by the World Health Organization as those between 10 and 19 years of age, avoid predators, including:


Have conversations. When you talk about their lives, their friends and their hobbies, it’s easier to start a conversation about tougher subjects like safety. Look for tips about ways to handle these types of conversations.


Let the phone and clothing help you. If you get the adolescent a phone, get one with a tracking app, or install one. Tracking can also be done with devices that can be inserted into clothing, or a wearable accessory.* Research ones that would be best for your situation. 


Let the vehicle help you. If they have a car, or access to one, consider installing a tracking device.* Again, do some research before you take this step.


Have up-to-date photos and identification. It’s easy with today’s cell phones and social media activity to have up-to-date photos. Remember to make sure the best photos are not on the adolescent’s phone. Many schools have ID requirements, but others don’t. Take advantage of opportunities to get identification for your child. If a child is missing, his or her photo and last location are the keys to locating him or her quickly.


Being prepared, and preparing your child, is always the best way to stay ahead of whatever safety challenges you and your family may face.


*We share this information to help you start your own research. We do not recommend any specific device(s), and do not benefit from sharing these links.

Learn From Your Mistakes

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learn from mistakes

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March 12, 2019


No one wants to make a mistake. Ever. Unfortunately, it’s part of being human. You will make mistakes. The challenge is to make sure you learn from those mistakes.


“Sometimes a mistake can get you down,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It’s not about how hard you get knocked down, but it’s about getting back up.”


Early in his career doing celebrity and executive protection, Griffin made an embarrassing mistake.


“It was during a trip to New York City in the winter of 1996,” he recalls. “My client met with Barbra Streisand at her home. She invited us to her upcoming event at Madison Square Garden. I was responsible for our carrying our credentials to the televised event, which included tickets for specific seats.


“The evening of the show we took the unusual step of catching a cab, and when we got to the multi-talented star’s red carpet event I realized that I’d misplaced our tickets. My client had no problem getting in, but I had to double back to the hotel to see if I could locate them. I didn’t. When I got back to the event, the head of security walked me to my seat to verify my identity with the client. This was a great relief, but I dropped the ball.”


Griffin says he appreciated the client’s understanding, and immediately started perfecting his craft.


"I learned how to call ahead wherever we went to meet the director of security, and any appropriate staff,” Griffin says. “Chiefs of police, sheriffs, whatever members of law enforcement I’d connected with, would meet us at airports. Security leaders also met us at venues. No more stopping at lights. No more problems presenting credentials. My name to many people was ‘The Bodyguard,’ and it carried a lot of weight.”


Griffin’s responsibilities quickly expanded beyond those of a “bodyguard,” and he credits his willingness to embrace his failures - as well as his successes - for the life he feels blessed to lead today.


“Learn from your mistakes,” he reminds us, “and never make the same mistake twice.”

Time To Travel

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travel safety tips

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March 8, 2019


Daylight Saving Time begins on March 10th, and the first day of Spring is 10 days later. That means that millions of people across the United States are thinking about taking a trip. They may already have it planned.


If it’s getting to be time to travel for you, here are a few tips that may help you have a safer, more satisfying experience:

Call ahead (or connect online). If you are traveling by plane, see if you can check-in early. Make sure your train or boat timing and travel details are as you planned, or reserved. Find out if there is a way for you to be notified of last-minute schedule changes.


Make sure your vehicle is in great shape. If you’re driving, make sure whatever vehicle you will use is road ready. You don’t want a vehicle maintenance break in the middle of your vacation. AAA has a helpful tip sheet.


Make a room request. If staying in a hotel, motel, or any place that has several rooms and more than one level, request a room closest to the nearest exit. If your room has direct access to the outside, make sure you understand the emergency exit procedures.


Walk the space. When you arrive, make time to walk the hotel, motel, or wherever you are staying. Use the stairs, if any, closest to your room. Check the emergency exit procedures. Confirm that the space meets your expectations, feels safe and comfortable, and is staffed by professionals.


Know the location(s) of the nearest hospital, or urgent care facility.


Refill all important medications before your trip. Confirm that you have the appropriate medications in the appropriate amounts packed as advised.


Make sure you have secure ways to carry your valuables. For example, the larger, open purse a woman may carry while running errands at home, will not be appropriate for a vacation.


Be mindful of how you handle your money. Depending upon where you are going, you may want to be mindful of flashing your cash. If there is an exchange rate, know it, and be prepared with local currency.


Be mindful of how you carry yourself. Enjoy your travel, whether for business or pleasure, but remain aware of your surroundings. Do you need to make that phone call while in a public location, and in that loud a voice? Does this person, or place, feel like the right one to ask for directions? It is possible to trust your gut and use good sense while remaining friendly and non-discriminatory.


When traveling overseas, make sure there are duplicate copies of your passport (one stays home, and one goes with you but is kept apart from the original). Have contact information for the U.S. Embassy in the country you are visiting, including the address, and contact them as appropriate. Research local transportation, traditions, laws and regulations, especially those that may have an impact on your trip. Include any local news and crime statistics, depending upon where you are going, how long you are staying, and your specific plans.


Most people travel safely most of the time. Make sure you, and those you care about, are among them.

Keeping Celebrities Safe

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celebrity safety tips

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March 5, 2019


Who is your favorite celebrity? Now imagine you bump into that person at your workplace. They’re there, right in front of you, without any special announcement or event. Imagine you’ve got to get right back to work, but you pause. Anyone would.


“Staying focused while keeping celebrities safe is hard,” says Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin. “It’s not like protecting most politicians or a property. Things can change very quickly, and you can find yourself surrounded by thousands of people wanting to get close to your client. Even when you get used to being around any type of high-profile client, you may find yourself close to someone who makes you pause.”


Griffin knows. He spent a decade providing security for celebrities.


“One cold, winter night while working a photo shoot for a national recording artist I received word that we would be attending a birthday party for another well-known artist, Usher,” Griffin says. “I didn’t have much time to prepare, so I quickly bought a black suit to accompany my artist to the event.


“As soon as we walked in I knew I would need to use a different type of security training. Our typical six or eight bodyguards with a motorcade in tow? Gone. It was just me. So there I was, literally shoulder-to-shoulder with a crowd of A-list celebrities. I had to stay close but not overbearing, because my client had a stalker. In the corner of my eye I saw Denzel Washington speaking with an NBA legend, then Mariah Carey dressed in a white fur coat greeted my client with a hug. The CEO of Bad Boy Records walked by with another big star, and I found myself in awe for a split second.


“When my client left the party, we pushed through fans and paparazzi yelling my client’s name.”


Staying focused and professional comes with time and experience. The best way to shorten the amount of time it takes is to prepare, as Griffin mentions in an earlier post. Even if you are doing security at a retail outlet right now, give it your best. You are building the professionalism that will serve you wherever your security career, or any career, takes you.


Better Safe Than Sorry

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home safety tips

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March 1, 2019


More than three million people in the United States age 12 or older reported being a victim of a violent crime in the past six months, according to the most recent statistics in the National Crime Victimization Survey. The Alliance for Safety and Justice reported that one in four people have been a crime victim in the past 10 years, and most of them want more resources poured into preventing crime and truly rehabilitating those who commit crimes rather than increased investments in prisons and jails.


Low-income people, especially non-whites, are more likely to be victims of crime, but the wealthy and well-known are also targeted.

Believe it or not, some basic behaviors can help limit your likelihood of becoming a crime victim, even if it’s already happened.


DO try these at home:

Make sure every door and window is locked when you leave home. When you go to school or work, a lot of criminals do. Most burglaries that occur when the victim isn’t home take place during the day.


Lock your doors and windows when you are at home, too. Day or night, a lot of criminals get in by simply taking advantage of an unlocked door or window.


Don’t leave spare keys in places that others can easily find. It’s the next best thing to leaving a door or window unlocked.


If you have an alarm system, use it. The best system is only as good as your commitment to using it, along with your good sense (see above).


If you plan to have a roommate, set ground rules ahead of time. Have a state background check done. Be careful when you let anyone in your home, especially those you don’t know.


Have insurance. Make sure your property and valuables are covered under homeowners, renters and/or hazard insurance. If you have renters, require them to have insurance.


Never take the same route when driving home from work, school, or any other regularly scheduled activity. This helps you have multiple routes to get home, and makes it much harder for others to know your schedule.


Your best efforts may still not be enough to keep you, your loved ones, and your valuables safe. If you become a crime victim, reach out for support from family and friends, law enforcement and courts services, as well as the faith community and other local organizations such as social service agencies.


So You Want To Be A Security Professional

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tips for security professionals

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February 26, 2019


There aren’t enough words to describe how we feel about the incredible men and women who are willing to put their lives on the line to defend others. Respect, admiration, esteem, appreciation, honor. These words only come close to describing our regard for anyone who puts on a military, police or security uniform.


But security work is NOT for everyone. Just like anything else, the best professionals make it look easier than it is. If you really believe you have what it takes to put on one of those uniforms, or provide a security-related function such as private investigation, we want you to start by developing three ways to operate that can secure your own safety as well as the safety of those you have chosen to protect: study, communicate, practice.


Leumas Security Services Founder Samuel Griffin tells a story about an experience early in his career when all of these principles came together. He served as head of security for a well-known public figure, who had decided to lead a 30-mile march in the Atlanta, Georgia area.


“The preparation consisted of months studying the area and meetings with state and local police, including SWAT teams, in each county and the city,” Griffin says. “We also coordinated with hospitals and ambulance services that followed the motorcade, plus security personnel with other dignitaries who would also be participating. We had several layers of protection, including police officers assigned to closely protect my client 24 hours a day for a week.


“Despite all our preparations, a man with a bag in his hand rushes through the crowd during the march,” Griffin remembers. “He broke through three levels of security only to be stopped by me, who was closest to the client. We searched him, and found out that it was only a bottle of liquor in the bag. He was just excited to meet my client.


“We had practiced security scenarios, so we were prepared. That man could just as easily have been an attacker. A person who is willing to trade their life for whatever reason is the most dangerous person in the room. You can never be over prepared when providing security. Make time for practice, practice and more practice. It pays off when you least expect it,” Griffin says.


Study security principles, policies and regulations. Also notice news reports of physical security breaches, and where security practices are being challenged. Ask yourself a variety of questions about how you would handle the situation. Imagine the scenario from different vantage points, such as imagining you are the officer involved, a possible victim, or the facility/venue where the incident takes place.


Communicate with appropriate parties. Wherever you are and whatever you do, there are opportunities to practice effective communication. It can be in your personal relationship, with family members and friends, or on your job. Can you be more clear, make your point using as few words as possible, and use language the person you’re communicating with can easily understand? Can you make the person you’re speaking to hears your care as much as any command? Have you ever written a brief report of a situation or event? If you’re not sure about any of these, practice.


Speaking of practice, do it. A lot. It’s not enough to make sure you’re in physical shape, even though that is very important. You may have to stand or walk for extended periods of time, carry several and/or heavy items while moving quickly, or carry, lift and lay something/someone down. Can you do it? You may also have to react quickly under stress. Do you know how you handle surprising and/or stressful situations? Practice excellent security procedures regularly, so they will be second nature when the stressful situation or emergency takes place. And it will, but you’ll never know when. As the Boy Scott motto says, “Be prepared.”


We wish you the best as you build your security career. If you need additional support, contact us to see if any of our consulting services or workshops are right for you.


Your Partner's Cheating Heart

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private investigators for family and business cases

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February 22, 2019


As the old Hank Williams song says, the cheating heart will make you weep. Possibly both of you. However, many people save the weeping for when they are sure their partner is, in fact, cheating.


Today’s lovers have extra tech tools that help them search for evidence that confirms their suspicions. There are too many ways for an unfaithful partner to get around old-fashioned things like digging through pockets, and checking credit card statements. Plus, there are several lists of “signs” of cheating.


Many even hire firms like ours to get a private investigator on the case, a situation that we handle efficiently, professionally and with emotional care.


In our experience, people are most likely to hire us when there are children involved, a significant property settlement if the marriage/relationship dissolves, potential for violence, or some combination of all of these factors.


If you suspect your spouse/partner is cheating, we’d like you to keep two things in mind:

First, put as much energy into exploring your feelings about the situation as the situation itself. Whether you’re right or wrong, it will help to get some support from a professional. Look for resources that are easy for you to access based on considerations like location, cost and specific concern (such as domestic violence, gender identity, culture). Could your partner really be working late on a special project, and a past betrayal - even among your parents, other family members, or friends - is coloring the way you view the schedule change? Have you cheated in the past for reasons that were not even clear to you, and are now concerned about payback? Relationships, and betrayal within relationships, can be incredibly complicated. A neutral professional can help you sort things out.


Second, if you feel that you must confirm your suspicions, do it in a way that will best serve you going forward. Don’t let your pain, anger, or fear prompt you to do something that could limit some of your important options in the future, and/or put you at risk. Any children you may have, or other family members, could also be at risk. Risk is not only physical. There are often financial and emotional consequences to consider as well.


Something else to consider: If there is an affair, there is life after an affair. Many couples find ways to stay together and strengthen their commitment. Others go their separate ways, and find fulfilling lives strengthened by the devastating experience. Make sure you have the information and emotional support you need to make wise decisions about how to handle your specific situation.


Judgement Day? Not On His Watch

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February 19, 2019


Decades ago, Leumas Security Services founder Samuel Griffin was on his third day leading security for a presidential candidate. He’d already criss-crossed the nation on jets, had to scrutinize people he’d idolized, and could comfortably understand security information on an earpiece while a crowd of thousands roared.


Then one cold, winter night in Iowa, the State Police called just as he was settling into his hotel room. A hate group had stated this was Judgement Day for his client. Griffin told his client, who reminded Griffin that his life was in Griffin’s hands.


“I went to my knees and prayed,” Griffin remembered. “When I got up, my common sense and what I’d already learned about security kicked in. I asked for a meeting with the state and local police departments. I asked them to extend the security perimeter, and not allow anyone within the close protection circle. We also skipped the rope line where politicians typically greet their supporters.

“It only cost me a migraine, the first of many after a tense evening of executive protection work, but the hate group did not get the opportunity to judge my client,” Griffin said. “Not on my watch.”


Griffin also said he became clear that night about the power of his faith, and the fact that there is greatness in everyone. With that clarity he built a security company that he has owned with his wife Imani Harris-Griffin for more than 20 years, and continues to look for ways to expand. He also enjoys sharing what he's learned about security and life.


“You’ve got to live your dreams,” he said. “It’s not going to be easy, and most people don’t finish the race toward their dreams, but it can be done.”


How? Using principles he’s built into Leumas Security Services:

*Honesty. Tell the truth to yourself, and to your clients. This basic principle is rooted in Griffin’s faith, but he believes any person of good character will always find a way to be honest.

*Hard work. Griffin worked with migraines, tooth aches, back aches, and his clients and colleagues almost never knew. However, hard work is not always physically painful. It can mean putting in the time to study when you would rather be watching the game, or whatever is necessary for you to successfully live your dreams.

*Customer Service. Always do your best to give your customer your best. This seems obvious, but it always needs to be repeated. There are times when giving the customer/client the best service may even mean not working with them at all, sharing information that is uncomfortable for both of you, or correcting an error you were not directly responsible for.


“Don’t just support other people’s dreams,”Griffin said. “Live your dreams. More often than you think, the impossible is possible.”


Being a "Booster" for Those Who Boost Kids

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supporting the community, Captain George's

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January 28, 2019


Leumas Security Services, LLC, is proud to be a new Lafayette High School (Williamsburg, VA) Athletic Booster. While serving as primary sponsor of today’s boys basketball game, the company will make it possible for some lucky winner to leave with a free gift card!


Providing this type of support for the “Home of the Rams” has special meaning for Leumas Security Services, LLC, founder Samuel Griffin, III.


“My first two years at Lafayette High School were a blur,” he shared. “I was mentally recovering from my parents’ divorce. I spent most of my time in the library, too embarrassed to take the free/reduced lunch I qualified for. Back then you had to give the special card to the lunch lady, so other kids would know.


“To help out, I got a job as a busboy at Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant. Working 32-40 hours a week while in school, I was eventually able to help my mom and buy whatever lunch I wanted.”


During Griffin’s Junior Year at Lafayette, things got even better. “I met Coach Fields, who became my wrestling coach. He helped me advance to states my first year of wrestling. During my senior year I lettered, was on the Varsity Wrestling Team and found my voice.


“Life at home was no longer a struggle financially, but my brother started having trouble accepting our parents’ divorce and turned to life in the streets. I needed a way to keep the pain of my past from determining my future. I started writing the United States Secret Service, and found out that I had to go to college to even be considered as an agent.


“I quit wrestling my senior year at Lafayette High School, and started focusing on establishing a career. I was soon promoted to assistant manager at Captain George’s under the Leadership Of General Manger Greg Beehneer.


“I did go to college, where I was able to bring together my physical skills with my interest in public safety. I’ve been doing some type of security work for almost 30 years and today, with my wife, we run our own security company.”


Leumas Security Services, LLC, clients have included the Captain George’s where Griffin was once a busboy. Now that his company is an LHS Booster, Griffin wants to help coaches do for today’s students what Coach Fields did for him.


“You never know what kid might be financially broken, like I was, but mentally and spiritually rich. Those kids need coaches and other adults who can really see them, and those adults need all the support they can get from the rest of us.”


Winter Driving Check Up

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January 11, 2019


We hope you get your regular medical check-ups. When was the last time you gave your driving skills a check-up?


Sharp driving skills are especially important when weather conditions can make driving dangerous, like in the winter. Driving safety includes your ability to stay attentive enough to follow an old driving rule: Watch out for the other guy or gal. This is especially easy to do these days, when technology can help. Many cars offer upgrades that help you safely backup, warn you to buckle your seatbelt and stop you if something is too close. And of course you can go online for driving lessons, like these quick winter driving tips offered by Consumer Reports.


But no amount of technology can replace your good sense.


Make sure you are safely warming up your car when it's cold outside. For example, your car is not running in a closed garage, and you do not leave it unlocked and running where someone can simply jump in and drive away.


Keep your eyes on the road. There are entire campaigns dedicated this, such as Don't Text & Drive. Be mindful of how eating can take your attention away from your destination, as can other people in the vehicle.


The basic rules for staying safe and secure almost anywhere are the same when you are in a car: plan ahead, have the right equipment and make sure it is in good operating order, and stay alert.


Remembering the "Queen of Soul"

Posted on August 16, 2018 at 4:37 PM


Today the world lost an incredible artist long known as the "Queen of Soul," Aretha Franklin.


  The security business often leads to work with, for and around famous people. That was the case with Leumas Security Services founder Samuel Griffin. His work led him into Ms. Franklin's space on more than one occasion, so today brought up bittersweet memories.


"The last memory I have," Mr. Griffin said, "was of [Aretha Franklin] hugging me and telling me to have a safe flight."


Mr. Griffin went on to say that it was astonishing how such a big star with the breathtaking talent could be "such a little lady ... and loving towards me." Especially when she did not have to be.


May the Queen rest in peace. May the rest of us continue to celebrate her life, and follow her example as Mr. Griffin experienced her: loving towards others when we don't have to be.


Heartbreak-Free Holidays

Posted on December 1, 2017 at 3:25 PM


“The most wonderful time of the year” can quickly turn tragic. Why? Because it’s so easy for many of us to get caught up in the excitement of holiday decorating, cooking, traveling and gift giving, that we forget our safety basics.


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Safety basics this holiday season include:

If people you don’t know start fighting in a store, mall, or club, get as far away from them as you can. Remember: It may be tempting to record them with your cell phone, but even that could put you in danger and the police may want to confiscate your phone to gather evidence.


While shopping, carry your purse close to your body – securely closed, until you need to reach into it – or your wallet inside your coat or front pants pocket.


Be aware of your surroundings. That includes checking inside and around your car before getting in. Have your key and any personal safety device handy.


Don’t buy more than you can carry, and don’t hold your credit card out. Wait until the cashier asks for it.


Don’t leave your car running, with the keys in the ignition, and unlocked – not even for a minute outside your home.


Don’t leave valuables in plain sight in your car.


Practice safe driving. There are many resources to find specific driving tips, and make sure you also keep seasonal driving safety in mind.


Make sure indoor and outdoor decorations are safely displayed, and maintained.


Don’t multi-task your way to a house fire. Set timers and stay focused while cooking.


Practice self-care, too. Manage stress and wash your hands. Who wants to get sick over the holidays? The CDC’s “12 Ways to Health Song” can help you remember some great health/safety basics.


If you can manage to keep safety in mind over the holidays, you are well on your way to doing it through the New Year.


Have a safe, happy and healthy holiday season!

I Love the Night Life

Posted on November 30, 2017 at 9:05 PM


It’s that time of year again: When it gets dark earlier. There are also a lot of activities - parties, sporting events, shopping - that may begin in daylight, and end after dark even though it may not be that late.

nighttime safety tips

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This is a great time for a reminder about some basic rules of the road:

Start putting your bright, reflective clothes on earlier in the day. Make sure your children do, too. Afterschool activities that keep young people out until 5:00 p.m. or later weren’t that much of a problem a couple of months ago. They are now. See "Think!": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0c75VKvcsY" target="_blank"


Park and walk in well-lighted areas.

Let people know where you are going, and when you think you will arrive or return.


Walk against traffic, especially if there is no sidewalk or path. This means that you should be facing traffic, unless there is only one sidewalk and it is on the other side of the street. Using the sidewalk or path should always be your first choice.


Make sure your plans include travel time. Don’t ignore the rules of the road, like the speed limit, because you are running late. Slow down. You could get hurt, or hurt someone else. As it gets darker, it may be harder to see. If there is an emergency, you can maintain better control of your vehicle if you are driving more slowly. This includes driving below the speed limit when it is raining or snowing. See "Just Slow Down": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5EyOnccJLg


As you plan to enjoy the many activities coming up this winter, consider ways to make sure everyone gets there, and back home, safely.

Thanksgiving Tripping

Posted on November 21, 2017 at 4:40 PM


AAA expects more than 50 million people to hit the road to celebrate Thanksgiving this year, going 50 miles or more to
spend time with loved ones.

Thanksgiving

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89% of all travelers will be on the road. Are you one of them? If so, don’t be afraid to get back to basics when you, or someone you care about, is behind the wheel:

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  • Don’t let your gas tank get too low, and make sure your car is road ready. For example, make sure you’re not overdue for an oil change, your tires are properly inflated, and your windshield wipers work well.
  • Pack high protein snacks and water.
  • Have emergency supplies, like a working flashlight and First Aid kit.
  • Pay attention to the weather forecast for your destination.
  • Be well rested and alert.
  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drive impaired.
  • See the full Red Cross list, including tips for travel with pets, here.

Happy Thanksgiving!

When Your Fingers Do The Shopping

Posted on November 15, 2017 at 7:05 PM

As the days are cooling down in most of the U.S., the shopping season is really heating up. Too bad it’s heating up for thieves as well as honest shoppers. That may be especially true online.

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Online shopping is expected to grow this year, and that means the need to stay safe online does, too. The National Crime Prevention Council suggests that you:


*Update your computer’s security software.

*Keep your password secure.

*Shop on secure websites.

*Shop with companies you know and trust.


Other online security https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/saltzman/2017/10/28/6-tips-safe-online-shopping/802965001/" target="_blank">experts also suggest making sure sellers on sites like eBay are reputable, and steer clear of public “Hot Spots.”

These days whether you’re buying online or in a bricks and mortar store, smart shoppers still do their homework. Instead of simply considering what to buy, think about where and how to buy it, too.

Gun Safety and Kids

Posted on November 13, 2017 at 7:50 PM

If you are going to buy a weapon, your first step should be into a classroom. Learn how to handle a weapon, and what state laws govern legal ownership.

If you plan to keep the weapon in a home where there are children, take extra precautions. KidsHealth.org suggests talking to your children about gun safety, and the difference between real guns and play.

gun safety, kids gun safety

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They also suggest special care, like:

*Take the ammunition out of the gun.

*Lock the gun and keep it out of the reach of kids.

*Lock the ammunition and store it apart from the gun.

*Lock up gun-cleaning supplies, which are often poisonous.

Talking to your children about ways to stay safe, and carefully listening to their concerns, can make a world of difference.

For more information, click here.

It's That Time Of Year Again

Posted on November 3, 2017 at 4:55 PM 

personal safety

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Most people felt safe while going to concerts, clubs, stores or bike riding. For many people, tragically, that has changed in recent months. Large, news-making events where people have been attacked have a lot of us filled with fear when we even think about being in crowded areas as we head into the holiday season, when it seems like every place is crowded.


But this is also the season when see a rise in the number of everyday crimes. The person who violently attacks another, maybe even someone they supposedly love. The thief who takes advantage of our little lapses in awareness. But here is the bottom line: Even if you locked yourself inside your home all day, every day, you still would not be able to guarantee that you will be 100% safe. Yet you can be safer.


Here are 5 ways to fight fear - and crime - that help keep you, and those you care about, safe:


1. Keep using many of the basics you learned as a child. Examples: Look both ways before you cross the street, buckle your seatbelt, know where the exits are. You may be old enough to talk to strangers, but you're never too old to take time to properly assess them.


2. Lock up before you leave. That means your home, in most communities, as well as your vehicle. And make sure areas where you must enter, exit, walk/bike and park are as well lighted as possible.


3. Don't leave valuables visible in your vehicle, or outside of your residence.


4. Keep your purse and wallet secure. If you are carrying your wallet/money and keys in pockets, make sure the pockets are deep and not easy to reach into. If you carry a purse, make sure it is securely closed and safely carried.


5. Consider a personal emergency alarm, and/or a light, but remember that they do not take the place of good judgement.


Here's wishing you a season of safety that lasts for years to come.

Employees Ripping You Off?

Posted on November 30, 2014 at 6:15 PM

employee theft, customer theft

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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

tour group safety

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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

What a Trip!

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 10:10 PM


You don’t have to be a serious “leaf peeper” to be thinking about a fall foliage tour. Fall is a great time to take a wide variety of trips with a group, including a tour that can help students get their heads back into the books.


Before your tour bus pulls off, even if it's a school bus, make sure safety is also on board. We trust that you are thinking about safety, but want to make sure you consider some additional points.


*Have your detailed itinerary include the name and mobile number (when applicable) of every person on the trip, and have more than one copy. Handle this information responsibly.


*If a member of the tour group doesn’t have a mobile number, make sure they are partnered with someone who does.

*Have a security person go over the itinerary with you. Security professionals can help you better understand and navigate the tour area/location. When possible, have that security person join you. Depending upon the trip and size of the group, security only costs a few additional dollars per person. The peace of mind is priceless.


*Every moment doesn’t have to be accounted for, but there should be structure. Plan times when everyone should meet at specific locations. No excuses!


*Chaperones must maintain the agreed-upon tour structure. If tour organizers feel that a chaperone is not going to be able to do this, that person should be given another duty. Non-compliance is not acceptable.


*Tour organizers should have a plan in place for participants who do not comply with the tour guidelines.


*Tour organizers should have a plan in place for medical and other emergencies.


You want everyone to say “What a trip!” when they get home, and mean it in the best way possible.


What Clients Say-Kena Conference Center

Posted on August 29, 2014 at 7:30 PM

We are proud to serve the Kena Conference Center in Northern Virginia, and thank Dr. Alex Cullison for his support.

Here is the letter we received from him today:


Kena Conference Center has been employing the security officers of Leumas Security Services for a year now.


We have found the officers to be well-trained, professional and punctual. The company provides excellent service at a competitive rate.


 They are service orientated and communicate meaningfully and productively with their clients.


We recommend Leumas for all the types of services they perform in the security industry.


-Dr. Alex Cullison, Rental Agent


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During the holidays there's a lot of focus on safety for shoppers running around, mindlessly carrying the items they scored as the result of some great sale. Stores are also concerned, hoping those bags don't include something from a "sticky fingers." Some people call it getting a "five finger discount." Often times malls and individual stores hire companies like ours.


But here's something else security personnel can do for a business: help protect it from its own employees.


It's sad to say, but sometimes the thief raiding your company's coffers is an employee. Are customers complaining about odd differences in your prices? Problems keeping expenses like travel in line? Cash registers not adding up?


What you don't know can hurt you. Check out this list of signs that a restaurant employee may be stealing. This list of general employee warning signs includes things like a change in work habits, and missing items.


According to the FBI, employees are also likely to steal data if they have issues with some aspect of the business, organization, or agency.


Ways to protect your business from those hired to help it prosper - employees - include keeping a virtual eye on employees, getting to know your employees, and having an employee tip line.


If you need a company to help you develop a specific strategy for your business, give us a call at 800-372-9391.

"Do's" To Help You Do For Others

Posted on August 27, 2014 at 11:05 PM


There has been a lot of attention on law enforcement in recent weeks, and rightfully so. Law enforcement and private security professionals have the high calling of keeping people safe. Lives are always, literally, in our hands.


But they are human hands. They also require care. We encourage security professionals to take care of themselves. It is impossible to effectively care for anyone else if your needs are consistently unmet. That’s true in and out of uniform. 


self-care tips for security pros

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We encourage you to do what’s right, for yourself and those you are supposed to “serve and protect.” Don’t wait on official requirements.

Do:

*Make sure you feel appropriately trained. If you feel as if you need more or additional training, especially regarding talking in ways that cool tense situations, ask for it. We get the pride thing, but that’s what comes before the fall.


*Get to know those you serve. If you live outside of the community, try to spend some time there not being Mr. or Ms. Law-and-Order. Or, while working, be open to learning about them as people first, not crime stats waiting to happen.


*If there are obvious problems with diversity and/or lack of community representation, address them. Support leadership in efforts to fix them.


*Watch your stress level. It’s a stressful profession. It’s easy to get “help” from drugs, alcohol, risky sex, food, crazy spending, whatever. You might not even know that the stress is keeping this stuff going in your life. If you can’t stop doing anything on this list for a couple of days, you may have a problem. Get help. Talk to someone, and not one of the people you do that stuff with.


*Make sure there is random drug testing, and make sure that you always pass.


*Check yourself. Are you in this business because you truly want to serve the community, and keep people safe, or does the uniform make you feel big after a lifetime of feeling small? What better way to cover a self-esteem problem than to become the bully, and licensed for it? If you don’t want to protect others from the bullies of the world, maybe you need to take a break. Maybe permanently.


*Make sure you are well rested. If you have a lot of trouble sleeping, get professional help.


*Spend time with people who love you.


*Consider spiritual support. If you are a member of a religious or spiritual community, find out if there are ways you can get additional support there. Your “spirit” can also be fed through practices such as Tai Chi, yoga or meditation.


*Make time for fun. If you don’t have a safe, sane hobby, experiment with some activities. Pull out that old musical instrument, old toolbox or old car and live it up.


Yes, live. We want law enforcement and security professionals to live as much as we want people who encounter them to live. We believe that security and law enforcement personnel can, and should, be part of the solution to problems in every community. We understand that there will be times when the worst will happen, but we “keep hope alive” that they will become rare.

Thanksgiving Tripping

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